Voter's Edge California Voter Guide
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March 3, 2020 — Primary Election
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Special District

Poway Unified School District
Measure P Bond Measure - 55% Approval Required

To learn more about measures, follow the links for each tab in this section. For most screenreaders, you can hit Return or Enter to enter a tab and read the content within.

Election Results

Failing

32,836 votes yes (50.4%)

32,375 votes no (49.6%)

To improve classrooms, science labs, and career-training facilities that support college preparation/career readiness in math, science, engineering, technology, arts, and skilled trades/vocations, improve student safety/security, remove asbestos/lead paint where needed, and repair aging roofs, plumbing, and electrical, shall the Poway Unified School District measure authorizing $448,000,000 in bonds at legal rates be adopted, levying approximately 3 cents/$100 assessed value ($23,100,000 annually) while bonds are outstanding, with citizen oversight/all funds under local control?

What is this proposal?

Pros & Cons — Unbiased explanation with arguments for and against

Information provided by Source: League of Women Voters of North County San Diego

The Question

Shall the Poway Unified School District (PUSD) authorize $448,000,000 in bonds to repair and improve aging school facilities to meet students’ needs, with an increase in property taxes by $30 per $100,000 of assessed valuation?

The Situation

In 2008 PUSD passed a $105 million bond financed as a capital appreciation bond (CAB) which delayed repayment while the district accrued interest, costing $980 million by 2051.  In 2013 Gov. Jerry Brown signed legislation that would restrict use of CABs in financing school funding.

The Poway Union School District (PUSD) is San Diego county’s third largest school district with nearly 38,000 students, serving a 100 square mile area.  PUSD contains 6 high schools, 7 middle schools, and 25 elementary schools.  

A facilities management plan assessed PUSD and determined that some schools were built more than 50 years ago and don’t have the modern classrooms, science labs or instructional technology.  Older schools need upgrades to meet the same academic and safety standards as newer schools. 

The Proposal

Measure P would authorize the sale of $448,000,000 in bonds with an increase in property taxes by approximately $30 per $100,000 of assessed value to fund school modernization and renovation projects in 2020-21.  

In accordance with the California Education Code, a citizen oversight committee  will conduct independent audits to ensure all money is spent on PUSD projects and for the following purposes:

  • Renovate/modernize aging classrooms 
  • Repair/replace deteriorated infrastructure
  • Upgrade classrooms, labs and technology to support hands-on learning in science, engineering and math.
  • Improve student safety and security

To pass, the measure requires a 55 percent approval of the registered voters.

A YES vote supports this measure to authorize $448 million in general obligation bonds for school facilities.

A NO vote opposes this measure to authorize $448 million in general obligation bonds for school facilities.

Fiscal effect

The total cost of the bond, including principal and interest, is estimated at $649,215,000 million. The District estimates the tax rate could rise to an estimated $34 for every $100,000 of assessed valuation ($23,100,000 annually) while the bonds are outstanding.

Supporters say

  • If we don’t modernize our classrooms and schools, PUSD students will fall behind students in other districts that are providing high quality facilities that support high quality instruction.
  • PUSD does not receive funding from the State for facility improvements and long-term repairs. 
  • It’s been over a decade since PUSD’s last bond measure (SDUSD has passed 3 different bonds since 2008).
  • 62% of our schools will be in “poor” condition by the year 2023 if nothing is done.

Supporters include:

San Diego County Taxpayer’s Association
www.sdcta.org

 

Opponents say

  • The educational challenges we face are systemic with union priorities superseding the needs of students and teachers and can’t be solved by simply throwing more money at the issue.
  • What is needed is better prioritization of spending putting the needs of students and taxpayers first.
  • There’s no reason to believe that more revenue will improve school infrastructure, safety or education quality.
  • Proponents promote bond measures to avoid having to justify direct tax increases on working families.

Opponents include:

Republican Party of San Diego
http://www.sandiegorepublicans.org/endorsements.html

Measure Details — Official information about this measure

YES vote means

A “YES” vote is in favor of authorizing the District to issue and sell $448,000,000 in general obligation bonds.

NO vote means

A “NO” vote is against authorizing the District to issue and sell $448,000,000 in general obligation bonds.

Impartial analysis / Proposal

Source: San Diego County Registrar of Voters

COUNTY COUNSEL IMPARTIAL ANALYSIS

This measure was placed on the ballot by the governing board of the Poway Unified School District (“District”). This measure, if approved by 55% of the qualified electors voting on the measure, will authorize the District to issue and sell general obligation bonds in an amount not to exceed $448,000,000. If approved, the bonds may be issued in several series and may mature in 40 years or such shorter period as determined by the District Board. The interest rate on the bonds would not exceed statutory limits.

Approval of this measure will authorize a levy on the assessed value of taxable property within the District in an amount needed to pay the principal and interest on the bonds each year the bonds are outstanding. The Tax Rate Statement submitted by the District estimates the highest tax rate which would be required to be levied to fund this bond issue is $33.90 for every $100,000 of assessed valuation and the total debt service, including principal and interest, required to be repaid if all the bonds are issued and sold is approximately $650,000,000. These amounts are estimates. Actual amounts may vary depending on the timing of sales, amount of bonds sold at each sale, and assessed valuation.

Proceeds from the sale of bonds authorized by this measure can only be used for purposes described in the full text of this measure, as permitted by State law. Approval of this measure does not guarantee that the proposed projects identified by the District will be funded by the sale of the bonds. The District’s proposal for certain projects may assume receipt of matching State funds subject to appropriation by the Legislature or approval of a statewide bond measure.

The California Constitution permits property taxes, above the standard 1% limitation, to be levied upon real property to pay the interest and redemption charges on any bonded indebtedness for, among other things, the construction, reconstruction, rehabilitation, or replacement of school facilities, including the furnishing and equipping of school facilities, when approved by 55% of the voters if:

(1) the proceeds from the sale of the bonds are used only for the purposes specified, 

(2) the District evaluates safety, class size reduction, and information technology needs to approve a list of specific projects to be funded,

(3) the District conducts an annual, independent performance audit to ensure funds have been expended on the specific projects listed, and

(4) the District conducts an annual, independent financial audit of bond proceeds.

Additionally, if the bond measure is approved, State law requires the District to establish an independent citizens’ oversight committee. The District has made the issuance of the bonds in this measure subject to these legal requirements.

A “YES” vote is in favor of authorizing the District to issue and sell $448,000,000 in general obligation bonds.

A “NO” vote is against authorizing the District to issue and sell $448,000,000 in general obligation bonds.

Tax rate

Source: San Diego County Registrar of Voters

TAX RATE STATEMENT

An election will be held within the boundaries of Poway Unified School District (the “District”) on March 3, 2020 to authorize the sale of up to $448,000,000 in bonds of the District to finance improvements to educational facilities as described in the measure. If such bonds are approved, authorized and sold, principal and interest on the bonds will be payable only from the proceeds of ad valorem tax levies made upon the taxable property in the District. The following information is provided in compliance with Sections 9400 to 9404, inclusive, of the California Elections Code. Such information is based upon the best estimates and projections presently available from official sources, upon experience within the District and other demonstrable factors.

1. The best estimate from official sources of the average annual tax rate that would be required to be levied to fund this bond issue over the entire duration of the bond debt service, based on a projection of assessed valuations available at the time of filing of this statement, is 3.044 cents per $100 of assessed valuation ($30.44 per $100,000 of assessed valuation). The final fiscal year in which it is anticipated that the tax will be collected is 2047-48.

2. The best estimate from official sources of the highest tax rate that would be required to be levied to fund this bond issue, based on a projection of assessed valuations available at the time of filing of this statement, is 3.39 cents per $100 of assessed valuation ($33.90 per $100,000 of assessed valuation). It is estimated that such rate would be levied in fiscal year 2020-21. The best estimate from official sources of the lowest tax rate that would be required to be levied to fund this bond issue, based on a projection of assessed valuations available at the time of filing this statement is 1.062 cents per $100 of assessed valuation ($10.62 per $100,000 of assessed valuation). It is estimated that such rate would be levied in fiscal year 2047-48.

3. The best estimate from official sources of the total debt service, including the principal and interest that would be required to be repaid if all the bonds are issued and sold, is approximately $650 million, considering the assumptions set forth in paragraphs (1) and (2) above. The estimate results in a debt service ratio of 1.45 to 1, which is less than the maximum ratio of 4 to 1 allowed by Education Code Section 15144.1.

Voters should note the estimated tax rate is based on the assessed value (not market value) of taxable property on the San Diego County official tax rolls. In accordance with Education Code Section 15100, subparagraph (c), the District has obtained reasonable and informed projections of assessed property valuations that take into consideration projections (if any) of assessed property valuations made by the County Assessor. In addition, taxpayers eligible for a property tax exemption, such as the homeowner’s exemption, will be taxed at a lower effective tax rate than described above. Property owners should consult their own property tax bills and tax advisors to determine their property’s assessed value and any applicable tax exemptions.

The attention of all voters is directed to the fact that the foregoing information is based upon projections and estimates only, which are not binding upon the District. The actual tax rates and the years in which they will apply may vary from those presently estimated, due to variations from these estimates in the timing of bond sales, the amount of bonds sold and market interest rates at the time of each sale, and actual assessed valuations over the term of repayment of the bonds. The dates of sale and the amount of bonds sold at any given time will be determined by the District based on need for construction funds and other factors. The actual interest rates at which the bonds will be sold will depend on the bond market at the time of each sale. Actual future assessed valuation will depend upon the amount and value of taxable property within the District as determined by the County Assessor in the annual assessment and the equalization process. Accordingly, the actual tax rate and the years in which such rates are applicable may vary from those presently estimated as stated above.

/s/ Marian Kim-Phelps, Superintendent 
November 14, 2019

Published Arguments — Arguments for and against the ballot measure

Arguments FOR

ARGUMENT IN FAVOR OF MEASURE P

Vote YES on Measure P to ensure safety, security, and success for Poway Unified students.

Vote YES on P to:

ENSURE SAFETY

  • Remove hazardous materials like asbestos and lead paint, where needed
  • Repair/replace roofs, plumbing, sewer lines, and outdated electrical systems
  • Upgrade older schools to meet the same standards as newer schools

ENSURE SECURITY

  • Improve student safety and campus security systems including fencing, cameras, emergency communications systems, smoke detectors and fire alarms

ENSURE SUCCESS

  • Provide classrooms with the infrastructure needed to support world-class instruction in science, technology, engineering, arts, and math
  • Provide modern labs and career training facilities to ensure students are college and career-ready

Poway Unified schools are nationally acclaimed for academic excellence, award-winning extracurricular activities, and strong career technical programs. High-performing schools are essential to protecting our home values.

Despite PUSD’s reputation for excellence, we are the lowest-funded unified school district in San Diego County. Voting YES on Measure P means Poway Unified schools will qualify for nearly $90 million in State matching funds that otherwise will go to different school districts.

It’s been over a decade since the District sought the community’s support to help modernize and improve our aging facilities. Measure P will enable us to remain competitive, innovative, and continue to provide high-quality education.

Measure P includes strict taxpayer accountability, including a Citizens’ Oversight Committee and independent audits to ensure funds are spent properly.

By law, Measure P funds can only be used to improve local schools. These funds can’t be taken by the State or used for teacher or administrator salaries or benefits.

ENDORSED BY THE SAN DIEGO COUNTY TAXPAYERS ASSOCIATION

Please join parents, teachers, seniors, community and business leaders by voting YES on P.

MARTIN REISERT
San Diego County and California Teacher of the Year

KATHLEEN PORTER
Executive Director, Career Technical, Adult, and Alternative Education

CAPTAIN THOMAS ADAMS, III,
USN, RETIRED ROTC Instructor

DAVE LEMASTER
Principal, Rancho Bernardo High School

SGT. WES ALBERS
Poway Unified Safety Committee Member

— Source: San Diego County Registrar of Voters

Arguments AGAINST

ARGUMENT AGAINST MEASURE P

Why is the answer always “more money”, i.e. more taxes? What is needed is better prioritization of spending, just like all of us do in our own household budgets.

Until existing funds are prioritized towards the direct needs of students and hard-working teachers rather than gigantic bureaucracies and union leader demands there is no reason to think that more revenue will improve the quality of education or increase our safety.

New bonds are promoted under the guise of improving the infrastructure and resources in schools, only to see existing district money squandered to meet labor union demands and feeding ever growing bureaucracies that don’t directly help students or teachers.

The problems we face in our schools are more systemic – making the top priority the placating of powerful union bosses and burgeoning school bureaucracies that crowd out teachers and the resources they need to properly educate our students.

Proponents argue that reforms have been made and that these additional funds will only go to worthy needs. But the reality is that new revenue allows school districts to shift existing school district money that's currently slated for maintenance and improvements to instead pay for bloated bureaucracies and associated pension benefits.

The truth is teachers struggle with classroom resources because of rigid labor union rules and too many bureaucrats, and wasteful contracting policies – not a lack of funding.

The needs of classrooms must be funded FIRST. Somehow student safety, facilities, and teachers get funded LAST, and then the tugging at the heartstrings comes in the form of issuing more bonds which means taking on MORE DEBT and MORE taxes to pay. No more.

Vote NO to force the right kind of prioritization in school spending, putting the needs of students and taxpayers ahead of bureaucrats and union bosses.

MARY ELLEN STAMPFLI
Taxpayer 

TONY KRVARIC
Chairman, Republican Party of San Diego County

— Source: San Diego County Registrar of Voters

Replies to Arguments FOR

REBUTTAL TO ARGUMENT IN FAVOR OF MEASURE P

Vote NO on Measures P to avoid further wasteful bureaucratic spending at the expense of our students and teachers.

Every year we are told that our schools are underfunded, with our teachers lacking necessary supplies and school buildings rapidly decaying. These pleas are not exclusive to San Diego County, nor is the trend of drastically increasing education spending per pupil over the last several decades.

MORE SPENDING SOLVES NOTHING:

The U.S. spends more on education per capita than nearly every other country, and our local schools are no exception. We spend more and more with little to no improvement in our schools. This is because the educational challenges we face can’t be solved by simply throwing more money at the issue. The problems we face are more systemic, with union priorities constantly superseding the needs of students and teachers. The predictable result has been an insatiable bureaucratic desire for more funding, which comes in the form of taxes in one way or another.

BONDS ALWAYS REQUIRE TAX INCREASES:

While proponents promote bond measures to avoid having to justify direct tax increases on working families, the measures immediately increase property taxes. Furthermore, state and local governments will need to pay back the bonds eventually, which necessitates more taxes or unsustainable borrowing.

Until existing funds are prioritized towards the direct needs of students and teachers rather than unaccountable bureaucracies and union demands, there’s no reason to believe that more revenue will improve school infrastructure, safety, or education quality.

TONY KRVARIC
Chairman, Republican Party of San Diego County 

— Source: San Diego County Registrar of Voters

Replies to Arguments AGAINST

REBUTTAL TO ARGUMENT AGAINST MEASURE P

Our hardworking students in Rancho Bernardo, 4S Ranch, Santaluz, Rancho Penasquitos, Torrey Highlands, Sabre Springs, Carmel Mountain Ranch, and Poway deserve a safe and secure place to work and learn. Without safety and security, their continued success is in jeopardy.

Safe and secure facilities are directly linked to providing high-quality education. Poway Unified School District is the lowest-funded school district in San Diego County, and the only way to adequately fund our infrastructure needs is through local bonds.

Under Measure P, all funds stay with our local schools. Passage of Measure P means Poway Unified School District will qualify for nearly $90 million in state matching funds.

No bond monies can ever be used for administrator or teacher salaries or pensions.

Measure P will enable important school repairs such as removing hazardous materials like asbestos and lead paint, repairing leaky roofs, fixing plumbing problems, repairing sewer lines, and replacing outdated electrical systems. These upgrades mean older schools will meet the same standards as new schools.

All construction contracts are awarded to the lowest, most qualified bidder.

The District’s new board and administration demand fiscal accountability and have implemented strict processes and procedures to be good stewards of taxpayer money. District leadership has saved taxpayers millions of dollars by refinancing prior bonds, budgeting prudently, and improving the District’s credit rating to AA+.

Measure P is endorsed by the San Diego County Taxpayers Association.

Measure P will keep Poway Unified schools among the best in the nation.

The wisest investment we can make as homeowners and taxpayers is in our schools.

Vote YES on P for Poway Unified schools.

KATIE WU
PUSD & San Diego County Teacher of the Year

CAYLIN FRANK
City of Poway Councilmember

GREG MAGNO
Principal - Mt. Carmel H.S.

RAY SHAY
Retired Lieutenant, SDPD & Local Real Estate Expert

MARIAN KIM PHELPS, Ed.D.
Poway Unified Superintendent

— Source: San Diego County Registrar of Voters

Read the proposed legislation

Proposed legislation

POWAY UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT BOND PROPOSITION
FULL BALLOT TEXT

By approval of this proposition by at least fifty-five percent (55%) of the registered voters voting thereon, the Poway Unified School District shall be authorized to issue and sell bonds of up to $448 million in aggregate principal amount to provide financing for the specific school facilities projects listed below in the Bond Project List, subject to all of the accountability safeguards specified herein.

SECTION 1: KEY FINDINGS

  • The Poway Unified School District is committed to continuing a strong, high-quality educational program and preparing our students to succeed in today's competitive economy; and
  • Whether local students are planning to go on to college or directly into the workforce, they are provided with the skills they need to use today's technologies and have a solid background in science, math and technology so they can excel in college and well-paying jobs; and
  • Many of our schools are 30-40 years old and deteriorating, and even schools 20 years old require upgrades; and 
  • It is time to make essential repairs and improvement so our schools can continue to serve our community well for decades to come; and 
  • The District is conducting a thorough Facilities Master Planning process with input from parents, teachers, staff, students, principals and members of the community to identify the upgrades needed at each school site in order to meet basic safety and accessibility standards, to continue supporting academic achievement, and to address specific priorities at individual school sites; and 
  • The District believes that completing the identified upgrades will enable the District to ensure that all local students receive instruction in 21st century classrooms, labs and school facilities that support modern curriculum, provide a well-rounded education, and give students with [sic] the skills they need for college and the competitive global economy; and
  • The District recognizes the need to upgrade classrooms, labs, instructional technology and educational facilities to support engaging, hands-on learning experiences in subjects including science, engineering and math; and
  • This bond proposition will benefit local schools and no funds can be taken away by the State or other school districts, and by law, no money can be used for teacher and administrator salaries and other school operating expenses, including raises or pensions; and 
  • The District shall not issue any bonds as capital appreciation bonds or convertible capital appreciation bonds, and all bonds issued will be well under maximum statutory ratios of total debt service to principal for each bond series; and
  • This bond measure requires strict fiscal accountability protections including mandatory annual audits and an independent citizens' bond oversight committee comprised of local residents to ensure funds are managed and spent properly. 

SECTION II: ACCOUNTABILITY MEASURES

The provisions in this section are included in this proposition in order that the voters and taxpayers of the District may be assured that their money will be spent to address specific facilities needs of the District, all in compliance with the requirements of Article XIII A, section 1(b)(3) of the State Constitution, and the Strict Accountability in Local School Construction Bonds Act of 2000 (codified at Section 15264 et seq. of the California Education Code).

Evaluation of Needs. The Board of Education has evaluated the facilities needs of the District, and has identified projects to finance from a local bond measure at this time. The Board of Trustees hereby certifies that it has evaluated safety, class size reduction (including enrollment trends and classroom capacity) and information technology needs, in addition to other needs, in developing the Bond Project List.

Independent Citizens' Bond Oversight Committee. The Board of Education shall establish an independent Citizen's Bond Oversight Committee in accordance with Education Code sections 15278-15282 and applicable Board resolutions and policies, to ensure bond proceeds are expended only for the school facilities projects listed in the Bond Project List. The committee shall be established within sixty (60) days of the date when the Board of Education enters the results of the election in its official minutes.

Annual Performance Audit. The Board of Education shall conduct or cause to be conducted an annual, independent performance audit to ensure that the bond proceeds have been expended only on the school facilities projects listed in the Bond Project List. 

Annual Financial Audit. The Board of Education shall conduct or cause to be conducted an annual, independent financial audit of the bond proceeds until all of those proceeds have been spent for the school facilities projects described in the Bond Project List. 

Annual Report to Board. Upon approval of this measure and the sale of any bonds approved, the Board of Education shall take actions necessary to establish an account in which proceeds of the sale of bonds will be deposited. As long as any proceeds of the bonds remain unexpended, the Superintendent shall cause a report to be filed with the Board of Education no later than January 1 of each year, commencing on the first January 1 after bonds have been issued and some proceeds spent, stating (1) the amount of bond proceeds received and expended in the past fiscal year, and (2) the status of any project funded or to be funded from bond proceeds. The report may be incorporated into the annual budget, annual financial report, or other appropriate routine report to the Board.

SECTION III: BOND PROJECT LIST

The Bond Project List, which is an integral part of this proposition, describes the specific projects the District proposes to finance with proceeds of the bonds. All information contained within this "Section III: Bond Project List" comprises the list and description of permissible projects and expenses that may be paid from bond proceeds, and where such projects may be or are intended to be completed.

Proceeds from the sale of bonds authorized by this measure shall be used only for the construction, reconstruction, rehabilitation, replacement, furnishing and equipping of school facilities on the Bond Project List, which is organized as shown below by project categories. Projects to be completed are of various classifications, including new/replacement construction ("N/RC"), modernization of existing facilities ("M"), increasing capacity ("I") and updates to facilities to meet code compliance or safety requirements ("U"). Each project is marked to indicate the classification(s) it meets. The classification(s) information is provided solely for informational purposes and shall not be deemed to limit or restrict the particular project listed.

In order to meet all identified facility needs, the District intends to complete projects using a combination of funding sources, including developer fees, Mello-Roos special tax proceeds and state funding (if available). In order to maximize community benefit and efficiently apply taxpayer dollars, the District will make a good faith effort to pursue practical opportunities to expand community joint use facilities in every new construction project. In pursuing joint use, the District's goal is to maximize the use of facilities by the broader community without adversely impacting District's operations or finances. In addition, the District will pursue state matching funds if and when they become available, and if received, they will be used for and mainly applied to projects on the Bond Project List or other high priority capital outlay expenditures as permitted in Education Code section 17070.63(c).

While no specific project is dependent on the receipt of state funding for completion, approval of this measure does not guarantee that all projects on this Bond Project List at all listed sites will be funded beyond the local revenues generated by this measure. The District's proposal for the projects assumes the receipt of some state matching funds, which could be subject to appropriation by the Legislature or approval of a statewide bond measure.

Specific projects to be funded by the bond measure include, without limitation, the following (schools/sites listed in alphabetical order):

CATEGORY A. PROJECTS TO IMPROVE STUDENT AND CAMPUS SAFETY AND SECURITY

Projects to improve student and campus safety and security shall include the following projects, which are authorized to be completed at each, any or all of the sites listed below:

  • Install fencing, gates and vehicle barriers to improve controlled access to schools (U, N/RC)
  • Upgrade signage (U, N/RC)
  • Upgrade, replace or install communications systems, including intercom, emergency communications and/or master clock systems (U, M, N/RC)
  • Upgrade fire alarms (U, M)
  • Enhance school reception areas to improve visitor management on campuses (U, M)
  • Install video surveillance cameras (U, N/RC)
  • Upgrade playgrounds, tracks and fields (U, M)
  • Install shade structures (N/RC)
  • Improve, add, or upgrade school site technology and infrastructure in order to enhance network-based content and curriculum delivery and network security (I, M, N/RC)
  • Abate hazardous materials such as asbestos and lead paint from older school sites (U, M)

Schools and Sites where Category A projects are planned:

  • Abraxas High
  • Adobe Bluffs Elementary
  • Bernardo Heights Middle
  • Black Mountain Middle
  • Canyon View Elementary
  • Chaparral Elementary
  • Creekside Elementary
  • Deer Canyon Elementary 
  • Del Norte High
  • Del Sur Elementary
  • Design 39 Campus
  • Garden Road Elementary
  • Highland Ranch Elementary
  • Los Penasquitos Elementary
  • Meadowbrook Middle
  • Mesa Verde Middle
  • Midland Elementary
  • Monterey Ridge Elementary
  • Morning Creek Elementary
  • Mt. Carmel High
  • Oak Valley Middle
  • Painted Rock Elementary
  • Park Village Elementary
  • Pomerado Elementary
  • Poway High
  • Rancho Bernardo High
  • Rolling Hills Elementary
  • Shoal Creek Elementary
  • Stone Ranch Elementary
  • Sundance Elementary
  • Sunset Hills Elementary
  • Tierra Bonita Elementary
  • Turtleback Elementary
  • Twin Peaks Middle
  • Valley Elementary
  • Westview High
  • Westwood Elementary
  • Willow Grove Elementary

CATEGORY B: PROJECTS TO MODERNIZE AND IMPROVE BUILDING FUNCTIONS AND SYSTEMS

Projects to modernize and improve building functions and systems include the following projects, which are authorized to be completed at each, any or all of the sites listed below:

  • Repair/replace heating, ventilation & air conditioning (HVAC) systems (M, N/RC)
  • Replace or repair roofs (M, N/RC)
  • Renovate school or classroom interiors, including fixtures, flooring, paint, ceilings and lighting (M, N/RC)
  • Upgrade school or site exteriors, including walls, paint, lighting, windows and doors (M, N/RC)
  • Upgrade electrical infrastructure (U, M)
  • Upgrade utility/sewer/water/gas lines and plumbing infrastructure (U, M)
  • Upgrade restrooms (U, M, I)
  • Perform Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) compliance upgrades (U, M, N/RC)
  • Renovate multipurpose rooms, gymnasiums, and performing arts classrooms/facilities (U, M, N/RC)

Schools and Sites where Category B projects are planned:

  • Abraxas High
  • Adobe Bluffs Elementary
  • Bernardo Heights Middle
  • Black Mountain Middle
  • Canyon View Elementary
  • Chaparral Elementary
  • Creekside Elementary
  • Deer Canyon Elementary 
  • Garden Road Elementary
  • Highland Ranch Elementary
  • Los Penasquitos Elementary
  • Meadowbrook Middle
  • Mesa Verde Middle
  • Mt. Carmel High
  • Painted Rock Elementary
  • Park Village Elementary
  • Poway High
  • Rancho Bernardo High
  • Rolling Hills Elementary
  • Shoal Creek Elementary
  • Sunset Hills Elementary
  • Tierra Bonita Elementary
  • Turtleback Elementary
  • Twin Peaks Middle
  • Valley Elementary
  • Westview High

CATEGORY C: PROJECTS TO CREATE FUTURE-FOCUSED LEARNING ENVIRONMENTS TO SUPPORT SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY, ENGINEERING AND MATH CURRICULUM AND CAREER/TECHNICAL EDUCATION TRAINING OPPORTUNITIES AND OPERATIONAL SUPPORT LOCATIONS

Projects to create future-focused learning environments to support science, technology, engineering and math curriculum and career/technical education training opportunities include the following projects, which are authorized to be completed at each, any or all of the sites listed below:

  • Reconfigure libraries and other spaces to include innovation/collaboration space (M, N/RC)
  • Create or construct, furnish and equip additional and/or dedicated career technical education classrooms, labs and learning spaces, buildings or campuses (M, N/RC, I) 
  • Enhance and/or expand special education classrooms and space (U, M, N/RC)
  • Create or construct additional student support offices and spaces (N/RC, I, M)
  • Improve, add, or upgrade school site technology and curriculum delivery and network security (U, M, N/RC)

Schools and Sites where Category C projects are planned:

  • Adobe Bluffs Elementary
  • Bernardo Heights Middle
  • Black Mountain Middle
  • Canyon View Elementary
  • Chaparral Elementary
  • Creekside Elementary
  • Deer Canyon Elementary 
  • Garden Road Elementary
  • Highland Ranch Elementary
  • Los Penasquitos Elementary
  • Meadowbrook Middle
  • Mesa Verde Middle
  • Midland Elementary
  • Morning Creek Elementary
  • Mt. Carmel High
  • Painted Rock Elementary
  • Pomerado Elementary
  • Poway High
  • Rancho Bernardo High
  • Rolling Hills Elementary
  • Sundance Elementary
  • Sunset Hills Elementary
  • Tierra Bonita Elementary
  • Turtleback Elementary
  • Twin Peaks Middle
  • Valley Elementary
  • Westview High
  • Westwood Elementary

CATEGORY D: PROJECTS TO SUPPORT GROWTH AND CHANGING PROGRAMMATIC NEEDS

Projects to support growth and changing programmatic needs include the following projects, with [sic] are authorized to be completed at each, any or all of the sites listed below:

  • Add, furnish and equip classrooms, labs and other learning spaces, to support student growth (I, N/RC)
  • Renovate classroom space to meet state and local code and regulatory requirements (U, M, I, N/RC)
  • Remove or demolish aging portable classrooms (M)
  • Replace aging portable classrooms with new permanent, modular or portable classrooms (I, M, N/RC)
  • Acquire and upgrade joint use performing arts building located on District property (I, M, N/RC)
  • Upgrade and/or construct transportation and maintenance yards (U, M, I, N/RC)

Schools and Sites where Category D projects are planned:

  • Abraxas High
  • Adobe Bluffs Elementary
  • Bernardo Heights Middle
  • Black Mountain Middle
  • Canyon View Elementary
  • Chaparral Elementary
  • Creekside Elementary
  • Deer Canyon Elementary 
  • Del Norte High
  • Del Sur Elementary
  • Los Penasquitos Elementary
  • Meadowbrook Middle
  • Monterey Ridge Elementary
  • Morning Creek Elementary
  • Mt. Carmel High
  • Painted Rock Elementary
  • Pomerado Elementary
  • Poway High
  • Rancho Bernardo High
  • Rolling Hills Elementary
  • Shoal Creek Elementary
  • Sunset Hills Elementary
  • Tierra Bonita Elementary
  • Turtleback Elementary
  • Twin Peaks Center
  • Twin Peaks Middle
  • Valley Elementary
  • Westview High
  • Willow Grove Elementary

CATEGORY E: PROJECTS TO INSTALL ENERGY EFFICIENT AND SUSTAINABLE SYSTEMS

Projects to install energy efficient and sutatinable energy systems include the following projects, which are authorized to be completed at each, any or all of the sites listed below.

  • Add drought-tolerant landscaping (M, N/RC)
  • Upgrade lights to LED lighting (M, N/RC)
  • Install lighting controls (M, N/RC)
  • Add/install solar systems and battery storage systems (M, N/RC)

Schools and Sites where Category E projects are planned:

  • Abraxas High
  • Adobe Bluffs Elementary
  • Bernardo Heights Middle
  • Black Mountain Middle
  • Canyon View Elementary
  • Chaparral Elementary
  • Creekside Elementary
  • Deer Canyon Elementary 
  • Garden Road Elementary
  • Highland Ranch Elementary
  • Los Penasquitos Elementary
  • Meadowbrook Middle
  • Mesa Verde Middle
  • Mt. Carmel High
  • Oak Valley Middle
  • Painted Rock Elementary
  • Park Village Elementary
  • Poway High
  • Rancho Bernardo High
  • Rolling Hills Elementary
  • Shoal Creek Elementary
  • Sunset Hills Elementary
  • Tierra Bonita Elementary
  • Turtleback Elementary
  • Twin Peaks Middle
  • Valley Elementary
  • Westview High

Projects are intended to be performed at the specific sites listed for each Project Category; however, unforeseen events or conditions may created the need for a project to be undertaken at a site not indicated. The Board of Education may authorize the completion of listed projects at other schools, sites or buildings where the project is deemed necessary, even if such site or location is not specifically identified above.

Listed projects, repairs, improvements, rehabilitation projects and upgrades will be completed only as needed, and the listing of projects does not imply a particular prioritization among such improvements. Projects may be done in phases, based on Board of Education priorities. Decisions regarding the scope, timing, prioritization or other facets of project implementation will be made solely by the Board of Education by subsequent action. No Projet Labor Agreement (PLA) is currently envisioned or required for any portion of the anticipated bond expenditures, nor will the Board of Education enter into one unless required by law. Where terms such as "renovate," "upgrade," "reconfigure" and "improve" are used in the Bond Project List, the Board of Education has the discretion to determine the best method for accomplishing the project's objective. For any listed project involving renovation or modernization of a building or the major portion of a building, the District may proceed with new replacement construction instead (including any necessary demolition or relocation of existing structures), if the District determines that replacement and new construction is more practical than renovation, considering the building's age, condition, expected remaining life, comparative cost and other relevant factors. In addition, where feasible, projects may be completed in partnership with other agencies on a joint use basis using bond proceeds. Property, buildings and equipment on the bond project list may be acquired through lease, sale, lease-purchase, lease-leaseback or other project delivery or acquisition methods determined appropriate by the Board.

Each project is assumed to include its share of costs of bond issuance, architectural, engineering, legal and similar planning costs, construction management, bond project staff and consultants, staff development and training expenses associated with learning construction techniques and approaches and new bond-funded equipment and systems, the cost to furnish and equip projects, spaces and sites, and a customary contingency for unforeseen design and construction costs. Payment of the costs of preparation of facilities planning and project implementation studies, feasibility and assessment reviews, master planning, environmental studies, permit and inspection fees and temporary housing and relocation costs for dislocated programs or activities caused or necessitated by projects on the Bond Project List are permissible bond expenditures.

The final cost of each project will be determined as plans are finalized and projects are completed. Based on the final costs of each project, certain of the projects described above may be delayed or may not be completed. Necessary site preparation, grading or restoration may occur in connection with acquisition of property, new construction, modernization, renovation or remodeling, or installation or removal of modular classrooms, including ingress and egress, removing, replacing or installing irrigation, utility lines, trees and landscaping, relocating fire access roads and acquiring any necessary easements, leases, licenses or rights of way to the property.

SECTION IV: ADDITIONAL SPECIFICATIONS

No Administrator Salaries. Proceeds from the sale of Bonds authorized by this proposition shall be used only for the construction, reconstruction, rehabilitation or replacement of school facilities on the Bond Project List, including the furnishing and equipping of said school facilities, or the acquisition or lease of real property for said school facilities, and not for any other purpose, including teacher and administrator salaries and other school operating expenses, including raises and pensions.

No Capital Appreciation Bonds. The District will not issue capital appreciation bonds or convertible appreciation bonds from this measure.

Limit on Repayment Ratio. The District will not issue any series of bonds pursuant to this measure that results in a repayment ratio of total debt service to principal amount issued of more than 2.5 to 1, also expressed as no more than $2.50 for every dollar of bonds issued, which is well below the State law of 4 to 1 per each series of bonds. The District's debt issuance plans anticipate debt service ratios below 2.5 to 1 (see Tax Rate Statement for details).

Single Purpose. All of the purposes enumerated in this proposition shall be united and voted upon as one single proposition, pursuant to Section 15100 of the California Education Code, and all the enumerated purposes shall constitute the specific single purpose of the bonds and proceeds of the bonds shall be spent only for such purpose.

Other Terms of the Bonds. The bonds may be issued and sold in several series, and in accordance with a financing plan determined by the Board of Education pursuant to requirements of law. Bonds will be issued only as current interest bonds. When sold, the bonds shall bear interest at an annual rate not exceeding the statutory maximum and with a maximum term not exceeding the statutory maximum, provided that the average useful life of bonds sold will not exceed one hundred twenty percent (120%) of the average life of the projects being financed or as otherwise provided by federal tax law. Bond funds may be used to reimburse the District for Bond Project list expenditures incurred prior to the election and bond issuance, in accordance with federal tax law.

Attention of all voters is directed to the fact that the financial information contained in this measure is based upon the District's projections and estimates only, which are not binding upon the District, nor are the summary estimates, if any, provided in the Ballot Label. The actual tax rates, debt service and the years in which they will apply may vary from those presently estimated, due to variations from these estimates in the timing of bond sales, the amount of bonds sold and market interest rates at the time of each sale, and actual assessed valuations over the term of repayment of the bonds. The dates of sale and the amount of bonds sold at any given time will be determined by the District based on need for construction funds and other factors. The actual interest rates at which the bonds will be sold will depend on the bond market at the time of each sale. Actual future assessed valuation will depend upon the amount and value of taxable property within the District as determined by the County Assessor in the annual assessment and the equalization process.

In preparing this information, the District obtained reasonable and informed projections of assessed property valuations that took into consideration projections of assessed property valuations made by the County Assessor, if any, in accordance with Education Code Section 15100(c).

Who supports or opposes this measure?

Yes on Measure P

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Elected & Appointed Officials (0)
No on Measure P

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Elected & Appointed Officials (0)

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