Voter’s Edge California
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Presentado por
MapLight
League of Women Voters of California Education Fund
June 7, 2016 — Elecciones Primarias de California
Local

City of San Diego
Proposition D Charter Amendment - Majority Approval Required

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Resultados electorales

Passing

211,923 votos si (77.17%)

62,683 votos no (22.83%)

Shall City Charter section 70 be amended to conform to existing provisions related to the Strong Mayor form of government, by updating titles of specified officers and clarifying who has authority to fix their salaries and the City's compensation schedules; to specify the City's legal duty to comply with California's collective bargaining laws in establishing annual compensation schedules; and to update language?

¿Qué es esta propuesta?

Información básica sobre la iniciativa de ley — Información oficial sobre esta iniciativa

Resumen

City of San Diego

This measure amends San Diego Charter section 70 to conform to existing provisions related to the City’s Strong Mayor form of government, by updating titles of specified officers and clarifying who has authority to fix their salaries and the City’s compensation schedules; to specify the City’s legal duty to comply with California’s collective bargaining laws in establishing annual compensation schedules; and to update language. 

Análisis del analista legislativo / Proposal

San Diego City Attorney

San Diego Charter section 70 addresses who has authority to fix the salaries of officers and employees of the City of San Diego, and how and when salaries are determined.

Each year, the City Council (Council) adopts a salary ordinance, which includes compensation schedules for the City’s classified, civil service and unclassified employees.

As a general rule, the power to appoint an officer or employee includes the power to set salary or wages. Thus, the pay rate for most City employees is established by the City department director or designee, where the employee works, in accordance with compensation schedules established by the Council and applicable civil service rules. In several instances, however, the Charter specifies who fixes the salary of Charter-created officers.

If approved, the amendments in this measure would update the list of those officers and employees whose salaries are fixed by the Council, in accordance with the City’s Strong Mayor form of government.

The amendments specify that the Mayor’s salary is fixed by the Council, in accordance with Charter section 24.1. The amendments would add the City Auditor and the Independent Budget Analyst to the list of officers whose salaries are established by the Council. This language is in accordance with Charter section 39.1, which states that the Council sets the City Auditor’s annual compensation, following a recommendation by the City’s Audit Committee. The language also follows Charter section 39.3, which states that the Council appoints the Independent Budget Analyst.

The measure removes from the list of positions the City Manager (i.e., the City’s Chief Operating Officer), City Treasurer, and City Comptroller because their salaries are set by the Mayor in accordance with other Charter provisions. The amendments revise language to account for the fact the position previously titled “City Auditor and Comptroller” no longer exists. The authority and responsibilities of that position were transferred to and assumed by the City’s Chief Financial Officer in a 2008 ballot measure.

Section 70 must be read in conjunction with the Meyers-Milias-Brown Act, California Government Code sections 3500 through 3511, which governs collective bargaining between the City, as public agency employer, and City employees who are represented by a recognized employee organization. The City must comply with California’s collective bargaining laws, regardless of whether the Charter specifies it must. This measure adds language to acknowledge this governing state law.

Under state law, the City must complete a meet and confer process before the Council makes final decisions on compensation schedules for the next fiscal year. Amendments would remove language stating that increases and decreases in salaries or wages must be determined at the time the City budget is prepared and adopted. In its place, amendments would confirm that the compensation schedules are established in accordance with California’s collective bargaining laws.

The Council’s Charter Review Committee approved sending this measure to the ballot and the Council voted to place it on the June ballot. If approved, the Charter amendments will become effective after they are chaptered by the California Secretary of State. 

Efectos fiscales

City of San Diego

This measure would update an outdated City Charter section dealing with the power to fix and recommend salaries for certain City officers and employees. The update is intended to conform this section of the Charter to the City’s current form of government and California Government Code.

There is no fiscal impact associated with the amendments to this Charter section.

Published Arguments — Arguments for and against the ballot measure

Argumento A FAVOR

The Charter, the Constitution for the City of San Diego, was first written 85 years ago, and has not undergone a thorough review or update since then. Some Charter articles and many sections are simply unnecessary, outdated, confusing, or worse, contain misinformation. The Charter needs to be updated to reflect how the City operates in the 21st Century and to be more open, transparent, and easy for citizens to read.

The Charter Review Committee worked with the City’s Auditor, Chief Financial Officer, the Independent Budget Analyst, the City Attorney and the Mayor’s office to develop these proposed Charter changes.

These recommended Charter changes regarding the City’s requirements for power to fix salaries will:

  • Conform to the City’s strong mayor form of government, which was made permanent by City voters on June 8, 2010.
  • Include recognition of the City’s duty to comply with the Meyers-Milias-Brown Act, the State law governing collective bargaining that the City is required to follow.
  • Remove archaic language and replace it with current, straightforward language.

Your “yes” vote on Prop D will update the City’s power to fix salaries to read in plain language and more accurately reflect current practices.

Prop D has strong support from the City Council, League of Women Voters of San Diego, and the San Diego Regional Chamber of Commerce.

Sherri Lightner,
City Council President

Chris Cate,
City Councilmember

Jerry Sanders,
President & CEO,
San Diego Regional Chamber of Commerce

Jeanne Brown,
President,
League of Women Voters of San Diego

— City of San Diego

Argumento EN CONTRA

No argument against Proposition D was filed in the office of the City Clerk.

— City of San Diego

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