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November 3, 2020 — California General Election
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County

San Joaquin CountyCandidate for Supervisor, District 5

Photo of Robert Rickman

Robert Rickman

Mayor / Police Sergeant
34,180 votes (50.52%)Winning
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My Top 3 Priorities

  • Address the rising cost of living and provide real solutions to the homeless crisis
  • Reduce daily traffic commute times and better roads
  • Ensure neighborhoods are safe

Experience

Experience

Profession:State Police Sergeant, Mayor of Tracy
California Police Officer / Sergeant, California (not availa–current)
Mayor, City of Tracy — Elected position (2015–current)
City Council Member, City of Tracy — Elected position (2010–2014)

Education

Sacramento State University Bachelor of Science
Humphrey’s School of Law Juris Doctor (2008)

Community Activities

Criminal Justice Advisory Board Member, Humphrey’s School of Law (not availa–not availa)
Member, Elks Lodge (not availa–not availa)
Regional Officer of the Year, Veterans of Foreign Wars (VFW) (2008–2008)

Biography

Robert Rickman is the Mayor of Tracy and 3rd generation resident of San Joaquin County. He’s married and has two beautiful daughters (17 and 16). Robert graduated from Tracy High School in 1991, attended San Joaquin Delta College and Sacramento State University where he obtained his Bachelor of Science degree. He graduated from Humphrey’s School of Law in 2008 with a Juris Doctor degree.

For the better part of two decades, Robert Rickman has been employed as a State Police Officer and Sergeant.  He currently works in the Tracy area not only serving our community, but keeping the people of our region safe.  In, 2008, he had the honor of once again being selected VFW Regional Officer of the Year.

Robert Rickman served as an adjunct professor at ITT Technical Institute and served on the Criminal Justice Advisory Board at Humphrey’s College. He is also a member of St. Bernard’s Church and the ELKS Lodge.

Robert Rickman was elected to the Tracy City Council in 2010 and 2014. In 2015, he was voted unanimously as the Mayor Pro Tem. He was elected Mayor of the City of Tracy in 2016 and 2018.

Who supports this candidate?

Featured Endorsements

  • John Muniz, Tracy Rural Fire Protection District / South San Joaquin County Fire Authority
  • Brian Lucid, Mountain House CSD
  • Daniel Harrison, President, Mountain House CSD

Elected Officials (7)

  • Miguel Villapudua, Chairman, San Joaquin County Board of Supervisors
  • Supervisor Carlos Villapudua, (ret.), San Joaquin County Board of Supervisors
  • Sonny Dhaliwal, Mayor of Lathrop
  • Doug Kuehne, Mayor Pro Tem of Lodi
  • David Pombo, Lammersville Unified School District
  • Mike Restuccia, Ripon City Council
  • Ray Morelos, Veteran, Tracy City Councilmember (ret.)

Individuals (3)

  • John Vieira, Tracy Rural Fire Protection District
  • Pete Reece, Tracy Rural Fire Protection District / South San Joaquin County Fire Authority
  • James Willett, San Joaquin County District Attorney (ret.)

Political Beliefs

Political Philosophy

There is no question that homelessness has spiked in San Joaquin County over the last few years. It isn’t just a Stockton problem any longer; our homeless crisis is visually evident in all our cities including Manteca, Tracy, and Lathrop. According to figures released earlier this year, cities like Manteca saw a drastic increase in its homeless population. While local city leaders are on the front line doing everything they can to solve the problem, the root cause remains failed policies out of the State Capitol, including regulations that contribute to California’s ever-increasing cost-of-living, horrible early release laws like Proposition 47 and AB 109, failed substance abuse programs, and inadequate resources to combat mental health problems.

But as with many previous issues, San Joaquin County can’t wait for legislators in Sacramento to fix the problem. The fact is we need a new targeted, and deliberative, approach to reversing the homeless trend locally. The high cost of housing is an important contributor to homelessness, but it is only one part. We need to take into consideration other factors. Substance abuse problems, high rates of recidivism coupled with failed early release policies, a serious lack of available resources to address mental health issues are just a few of the circumstances that can lead to homelessness. As a law enforcement officer for the better part of two decades, I encounter individuals who experience each of these firsthand. We must get tough on those that require it, but we also need to be compassionate with those that need it.

The simple fact is unless we look at this crisis holistically and regionally, we just kick the can down the road. Our San Joaquin County region needs to look at the mistakes made by cities like Stockton, San Francisco, and Sacramento on this issue and learn from their failures. We also need to explore other policies around our state and replicate successful efforts, like the City of San Diego in recent years. After San Diego committed more resources to bolster its city trash and sanitation department, sanitation crews removed 4,000 tons of trash from city streets, lots, and sidewalks over a two-year period. The city is also implementing new programs to stop the revolving doors of hospitals and jails that just dump individuals out on the street again and again.

We also must do everything we can to make housing more affordable, not just for the population experiencing homelessness, but for everyone. I know many residents in San Joaquin County that are forced to commute hours to work every day due to the cost of rent or a home. That’s unacceptable and cannot be our new normal. If state leaders are not going to give serious attention to reforming outdated laws like the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) that add thousands of dollars to rents and mortgages, then we need to do everything we can at the county level to reduce barriers to building affordable homes.

This is a humanitarian emergency for California, and a cost of living, mental health, public health and safety, and substance abuse crisis. We must do better and rise to the occasion once more, because our state leaders have largely failed, and I don’t see their help on the horizon any time soon. We have risen to the challenge in the past and we can do that once again. I am confident that working together and working locally, we can attack the root causes and make significant strides to decrease the rate of homelessness in San Joaquin County’s cities and neighborhoods.

Position Papers

Rising to Meet the Homeless Crisis Challenge

Summary

There is no question that homelessness has spiked in San Joaquin County over the last few years. It isn’t just a Stockton problem any longer; our homeless crisis is visually evident in all our cities including Manteca, Tracy, and Lathrop.

There is no question that homelessness has spiked in San Joaquin County over the last few years. It isn’t just a Stockton problem any longer; our homeless crisis is visually evident in all our cities including Manteca, Tracy, and Lathrop. According to figures released earlier this year, cities like Manteca saw a drastic increase in its homeless population. While local city leaders are on the front line doing everything they can to solve the problem, the root cause remains failed policies out of the State Capitol, including regulations that contribute to California’s ever-increasing cost-of-living, horrible early release laws like Proposition 47 and AB 109, failed substance abuse programs, and inadequate resources to combat mental health problems.

But like many other previous issues, San Joaquin County can’t wait for legislators in Sacramento to fix the problem. The fact is we need a new targeted, and deliberative, approach to reversing the homeless trend locally. The high cost of housing is an important contributor to homelessness, but it is only one part. We need to take into consideration other factors. Substance abuse problems, high rates of recidivism coupled with failed early release policies, a serious lack of available resources to address mental health issues are just a few of the circumstances that can lead to homelessness. As a law enforcement officer for the better part of two decades, I encounter individuals who experience each of these first hand. We must get tough on those that require it, but we also need to be compassionate with those that need it.

The simple fact is unless we look at this crisis holistically and regionally, we just kick the can down the road. Our San Joaquin County region needs to look at the mistakes made by cities like Stockton, San Francisco, and Sacramento on this issue and learn from their failures. We also need to explore other policies around our state and replicate successful efforts, like the City of San Diego in recent years. After San Diego committed more resources to bolster its city trash and sanitation department, sanitation crews removed 4,000 tons of trash from city streets, lots, and sidewalks over a two-year period. The city is also implementing new programs to stop the revolving doors of hospitals and jails that just dump individuals out on the street again and again.

We also must do everything we can to make housing more affordable, not just for the population experiencing homelessness, but for everyone. I know many residents in San Joaquin County that are forced to commute hours to work every day due to the cost of rent or a home. That’s unacceptable and cannot be our new normal. If state leaders are not going to give serious attention to reforming outdated laws like the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) that add thousands of dollars to rents and mortgages, then we need to do everything we can at the county level to reduce barriers to building affordable homes.

This is a humanitarian emergency for California, and a cost of living, mental health, public health and safety, and substance abuse crisis. We must do better and rise to the occasion once more, because our state leaders have largely failed, and I don’t see their help on the horizon any time soon. We have risen to the challenge in the past and we can do that once again. I am confident that working together and working locally, we can attack the root causes and make significant strides to decrease the rate of homelessness in San Joaquin County’s cities and neighborhoods.

Videos (1)

We Need to be Clear About Homelessness — January 30, 2020 Rickman for Supervisor 2020

Homelessness is more than just a housing issue, and the time for a real conversation and action is NOW.

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