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November 3, 2020 — California General Election
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Local

City of San Diego
Measure A Bond Measure - 2/3 Approval Required

To learn more about measures, follow the links for each tab in this section. For most screenreaders, you can hit Return or Enter to enter a tab and read the content within.

Election Results

Failing

366,723 votes yes (57.5%)

270,554 votes no (42.5%)

GENERAL OBLIGATION BONDS FOR AFFORDABLE HOUSING. To provide permanent and supportive housing for extremely low- to low-income individuals and families, including supportive mental health and substance abuse services, for populations including veterans, seniors, the disabled, youth and the homeless, shall the City of San Diego issue up to $900 million in general obligation bonds financed by property tax assessments estimated between approximately $3 and $21 per each $100,000 of assessed valuation for fiscal years 2022 through 2068?

What is this proposal?

Pros & Cons — Unbiased explanation with arguments for and against

Information provided by Source: League of Women Voters San Diego

The Question

Should $900 million in general obligation bonds, secured by new taxes on real property located within the City of San Diego, be issued for the purpose of providing affordable housing?

The Situation

San Diego has a severe shortage of affordable housing and housing for the homeless. According to a May 2020 report by the San Diego Housing Commission, approximately 60,600 households are in the Extremely Low-Income category (30% or less of Area Median Income) and an additional 104,500 households are labeled as Very Low-Income (30-50% of Area Median Income) and as Low-Income (50-80% of Area Median Income) categories. These income thresholds are defined using federal standards and currently include households with zero income up to the current Area Median Income, which for a family of four is $92,400.

Eighty-five percent of the Extremely Low-Income households are paying more than 50% of their income for housing and 48% of Very Low-Income households are paying more than 50% for housing. Also the report states that the gap is growing as the supply of naturally occurring affordable housing (units that do not have rent restrictions) continues to shrink. 

Additional context:

In the March, 2020 Primary, Measure C required approval of two-thirds of voters but it failed with only 65%. It would have increased the Transient Occupancy Tax to provide bond funds to expand the Convention Center, funds for homeless assistance and funds for street repairs. It would have raised an estimated $140 million for homeless assistance in the first five years and $750 million for homeless assistance over the 42-year life of the bonds. 

In 2016, voters approved Measure M which increased the maximum number of affordable housing units which could be developed by the City of San Diego or other public agencies without requiring a vote of the people. The previous limit was 10,500 and it was increased by 38,500 to 49,000 affordable units.

The Proposal

The current measure would increase property taxes on real property in the City of San Diego to secure up to $900 million in bonds to be issued by the City. The additional taxes are estimated to be approximately $3.14 per $100,000 of a property’s assessed valuation in FY 2022, increasing to a maximum of $20.85 per $100,000 over the potential 42 year life of the bonds. Bond proceeds would be used to acquire or improve real property to provide permanent supportive and affordable housing for “vulnerable populations,” those with extremely-low and low-income, those at risk of becoming homeless, and people suffering from mental health or substance abuse illnesses. 

If the measure is approved, the City intends to construct and distribute new affordable housing across the City and to leverage bond proceeds by attracting private and public matching funds, including from state and federal sources. Currently, there is no source for matching funds. If approved, bond proceeds will be administered by the San Diego Housing Commission, which will report to the City Council. The City Council would establish an advisory Citizens Oversight Committee to ensure fiscal accountability.

Certain property owners are subject to the City’s Inclusionary Affordable Housing Regulations or Housing Impact Fees on Commercial Development. If this measure is approved, the Council will introduce an ordinance providing that property owners subject to these laws will be entitled to a credit or reimbursement of such fees and costs, in an amount equal to the tax they would pay under this measure.

Fiscal effect

This measure would authorize the City of San Diego to issue taxable or tax-exempt general obligation bonds in an amount not to exceed $900 million to provide permanent supportive and affordable housing for Extremely Low-Income, Very Low-Income and Low-Income individuals and families.

The measure also contains a provision that could result in a credit or reimbursement for certain developers/owners of real property who have either paid a separate fee supporting Affordable Housing or who elect or have elected to construct Affordable Housing. If this credit /reimbursement provision were to be approved by the City Council, it would reduce other funds available for Affordable Housing in an amount that cannot yet be determined.

Assuming a $150 million 40-year taxable bond is the first to be issued in 2022, the annual tax is estimated to be $3.14 per $100,000 of assessed property value or $21.33 for a median value home in the city with an assessed value of $679,000. If additional $125 million 40-year taxable bonds were to be issued in each of the next 6 years, to reach the maximum bond authorization of $900 million, the annual tax would increase to $20.85 per $100,000 of assessed property value in 2020 or $141.54 annually for a $679,000 median value home in the city.  

Supporters say

  • Would allow San Diego to provide a long-term policy to address homelessness and also provide affordable homes so that hardworking San Diego families can afford to stay in San Diego.
  • Would generate local funds needed to match millions in federal and state matching funds that San Diego currently cannot access.
  • Would create safe, clean and healthy homes for low-income seniors, veterans and those with mental health and physical related disabilities.
  • Would provide affordable homes near jobs for low-income families.

The factual accuracy of these arguments has not been verified by any official entity.

Opponents say

  • In total, in the first five years under Measure A, the average homeowner will see their property tax increase by $500 or more. Taxpayers will be paying for these bonds for more than 40 years.
  • San Diego already has the highest property tax rate in the county and too many working families are struggling with the high cost-of-living. In the midst of a pandemic, San Diegans cannot afford a property tax increase.
  • Measure A does not ban controversial Project Labor Agreements (PLAs), which opponents say discriminate against non-union firms which are predominantly small, veteran-owned and minority-owned businesses.
  • Los Angeles projects similar to those that would be funded by Measure A have been riddled by wasteful spending and financial mismanagement, with the developer’s “soft costs” (e.g. consultants, fees and financing) accounting for 35%-40% of the cost of each project.

The factual accuracy of these arguments has not been verified by any official entity.

Measure Details — Official information about this measure

YES vote means

A "yes" vote would authorize the issuance and sale of up to $900,000,000 of general obligation bonds secured by new taxes on real property located within the City to provide affordable housing.

NO vote means

A "no" vote would not authorize the issuance and sale of the bonds or the related tax.

Summary

Source: San Diego City Attorney's Office / San Diego City Clerk

BALLOT TITLE

Affordable Housing Bond Measure for the Acquisition or Improvement of Real Property to Provide Permanent Supportive and Affordable Housing for Vulnerable Populations

BALLOT SUMMARY

This measure would increase property taxes on real property within the City of San Diego (City), which would be used to secure up to $900 million in bonds to be issued by the City, all for the purpose of providing permanent supportive and affordable housing for vulnerable populations.

Additional taxes to be levied are estimated to be approximately $3.14 per $100,000 of a property's assessed valuation in fiscal year 2022, increasing to a maximum of $20.85 per $100,000 over the life of the bonds. The taxable or tax-exempt general obligation bonds supported by the new tax revenue would be issued in multiple series over seven years. Bond proceeds would be used to acquire or improve real property to provide permanent supportive and affordable housing for vulnerable populations, but may not be used to finance services or operations.

"Vulnerable populations" includes: (1) extremely low income, or (2) very-low income, or (3) low-income individuals or chronically homeless individuals, those at serious risk of becoming homeless, and individuals suffering from mental health or substance abuse illnesses. "Affordable housing" may include: (1) facilities for which assistance and services, such as mental health treatment, healthcare, drug and alcohol treatment, education, and job training may be provided by the City, other public entities, non-profit entities and/or private entities and (2) infrastructure and landscaping, including utilitites, sidewalks, and streets that are directly related to and necessary for the acquisition, construction, or improvement of the affordable housing.

If this measure is approved, the City intends to distribute new affordable housing across the City and to leverage bond proceeds by attracting private and public matching funds, including from state and federal sources.

If approved, bond proceeds will be administered by the San Diego Housing Commission, reporting to the City Council (Council). The Council will adopt and annual allocation plan to govern how proceeds are used and spent. 

The Council will receive annual reports describing the amount of bond proceeds collected and spent, and the status of every project required or authorized to be funded with the proceeds.

The Council will establish an advisory Citizens' Oversight Committee (the Committee) of individuals with relevant professional experience to advise on and monitor all proposed affordable housing projects funded with bond proceeds. The Committee will advise the Council to help ensure fiscal accountability. An auditor, selected by the Committee after a competitive process, will also review how proceeds are spent.

Certain property owners are subject to the City's Inclusionary Affordable Housing Regulations or Housing Impact Fees on Commercial Development. If this measure is approved, the Council will introduce an ordinance providing that property owners subject to these laws will be entitled to a credit or reimbursement of such fees and costs, in an amount equal to the tax they would pay under this measure.


https://www.sandiego.gov/sites/default/files/impartialtitlesummaryfiscalcombined-november2020.pdf

Background

Source: Text of City of San Diego Ordinance No. O-21219 / San Diego City Clerk

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

NOTE BY VOTER’S EDGE STAFF: The preamble to the ordinance that placed Measure A on the ballot (Ordinance No. O-21219) is transcribed here, because it contains official context that voters might find helpful.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

WHEREAS, on January 14, 2020, the City Council (Council) adopted a Resolution of Necessity Related to a Proposed Ballot Measure for the November 3, 2020 Municipal Special Election Concerning the Issuance of General Obligation Bonds to Finance the Construction of Affordable and Permanent Supportive Housing (Resolution of Necessity), on a 6 to 3 vote, which is attached to this Ordinance as Exhibit A, and on file with the Office of the City Clerk as Resolution No. R-312816; and

WHEREAS, the Resolution of Necessity confirmed a citywide state of emergency regarding a severe shortage of affordable housing in the City of San Diego (City), where cost burden is the most common housing problem experienced by renter and owner households, and most of the cost-burdened households are low- or moderate-income households; and

WHEREAS, the Resolution of Necessity confirmed the lack of more affordable housing has resulted in a high number of individuals experiencing homelessness within the City, and the number of housing units available does not satisfy the demand, as further detailed in the City’s Community Action Plan on Homelessness (Action Plan); and

WHEREAS, the Resolution of Necessity confirmed that the Action Plan calls for the creation of more than 5,000 new housing homes or units over the next 10 years through the construction or rehabilitation of supportive housing, and the provision of additional rental assistance for low-income households, rapid rehousing for households experiencing homelessness, and diversion resources for households new to experiencing homelessness, with a total estimated cost of $1.94 billion; and

WHEREAS, on July 7, 2020, the Council adopted Ordinance O-21214 calling a Municipal Special Election in the City for November 3, 2020, for the purpose of submitting one or more ballot measures to the City’s qualified voters; and

WHEREAS, to help address the needs confirmed by the Resolution of Necessity, the Council now seeks to place a measure on the November 3, 2020 Municipal Special Election ballot seeking voter authorization for the City to issue general obligation bonds, in an amount not to exceed $900 million, to help reduce homelessness, including those who are at risk of becoming homeless, in the City; and

WHEREAS, the specific purposes of the bonds to be issued are to fund the acquisition or improvement of real property to provide permanent supportive and affordable housing for vulnerable populations (Affordable Housing), which will help reduce homelessness in the City; and

WHEREAS, “vulnerable populations” includes: (1) extremely low income, or (2) very-low income, or (3) low-income individuals or families, veterans, youth, seniors, the disabled, the homeless or chronically homeless, those at serious risk of becoming homeless, and individuals suffering from mental health or substance abuse illnesses; and

WHEREAS, Affordable Housing may include: (1) facilities for which assistance and services, such as mental health treatment, healthcare, drug and alcohol treatment, education and job training may be provided by the City, other public entities, non-profit entities and/or private entities and (2) infrastructure and landscaping, including utilities, sidewalks, and streets that are directly related to and necessary for the acquisition, construction, or improvement of the Affordable Housing; and

WHEREAS, the proceeds of any bonds issued pursuant to this general obligation bond measure (Bond Measure) will be applied only to these specific purposes, as detailed in he measure; and

WHEREAS, the Council finds that issuing general obligation bonds to build Affordable Housing serves a public purpose and is the most cost-effective way to raise funds to acquire and construct the Affordable Housing needed, which will help to reduce homelessness in the City; and

WHEREAS, the San Diego Municipal Code (Municipal Code) requires certain developers/owners of real property (Developers) within the City to pay fees to support the supply of, or construct actual units that qualify as, Affordable Housing (Inclusionary Housing/Linkage Fees); and

WHEREAS, within 3 months of the certification of the voters’ approval of this Bond Measure, the Council shall introduce an enforceable ordinance (Subsequent Ordinance) that, if adopted, would provide that Developers subject to the Inclusionary Affordable Housing Regulations, codified in Chapter 14, Article 2, Division 13 of the Municipal Code, or subject to Housing Impact Fees on Commercial Development, codified in Chapter 9, Article 8, Division 6 of the Municipal Code (collectively, the Ordinances) will be entitled to a credit (Credit) toward Inclusionary Housing/Linkage Fees paid pursuant to the Ordinances or in the Case of Developers that elect or have previously elected to construct affordable housing, will be entitled to a credit as required by the Ordinances, and receive reimbursement (Reimbursement) for the Inclusionary Housing/Linkage Fees those Developers would have paid or have previously paid pursuant to the Ordinances, in an amount equal to the amount of Affordable Housing Tax they pay under the provisions of this Bond Measure, which Credit or Reimbursement may never exceed the total amount a Developer would be required to pay the City under the Ordinances; and

WHEREAS, article XVI, section 18(a) of the California Constitution allows public entities, such as the City, to incur indebtedness in any year exceeding the income and revenue provided for such year with the approval of two-thirds of the voters of the City voting on the measure at an election to be held for that purpose; and

WHEREAS, San Diego Charter (Charter) section 99 confirms that the indebtedness provisions in article XVI, section 18(a) of the California Constitution apply to the City; and

WHEREAS, Charter section 90.1, which authorizes the Council (by a two-thirds vote of the Council) to issue revenue bonds payable from enterprise funds for water facilities, wastewater facilities, or stormwater facilities, does not limit the authority of the qualified electors of the City to authorize the issuance of bonds for other purposes; and

WHEREAS, California Government Code sections 53410 and 53411 provide that any voter-approved local measure allowing a local agency to sell bonds must provide accountability measures that include, but are not limited to: (a) a statement indicating the specific purposes of the bonds; (b) a requirement that the bond proceeds be applied only to those identified specific purposes; (c) the creation of an account into which the bond proceeds will be deposited; and (d) a requirement that the chief fiscal officer file a report with the local agency’s governing body at least annually, describing the bond proceeds collected and expended, as well as the status of any project required or authorized to be funded; and

WHEREAS, the Bond Measure will establish accountability measures to ensure that the city uses the bond proceeds only for the purposes specified in this Ordinance, in compliance with California Government Code sections 53410 and 53411; and

WHEREAS, in compliance with the Charter and San Diego Municipal Code, the Council now desires to submit to the voters at the Municipal Special Election one ballot measure authorizing a bond issuance not to exceed $900 million for Affordable Housing, as detailed in this Ordinance, and fixing the maximum rate of interest to be paid thereon; and

WHEREAS, this Ordinance requires a two-thirds vote of the Council for approval, which will authorize the measure to be submitted to voters in the City of San Diego; and

WHEREAS, the Bond Measure requires approval by a two-thirds majority of the local electorate voting on the measure; NOW, THEREFORE,

BE IT ORDAINED, by the Council of the City of San Diego, that:

Section 1. One measure is hereby submitted to the qualified voters of the City of San Diego at the Municipal Special Election to be held on November 3, 2020, to be consolidated with the California State General Election to be held on the same date, with the measure to read as follows:  [END PREAMBLE]

 

https://www.sandiego.gov/sites/default/files/ordinanceexaminationperiod.pdf#page=15

Impartial analysis / Proposal

Source: San Diego City Attorney's Office / San Diego City Clerk

CITY ATTORNEY’S IMPARTIAL ANALYSIS

California law allows the City of San Diego to issue general obligation bonds with the affirmative vote of two-thirds of those qualified electors voting on the matter in the election.

This ballot measure would allow the City to borrow up to $900 million by issuing and selling general obligation bonds. The City would use this money to acquire or improve real property in order to provide permanent supportive and affordable housing for vulnerable populations. The money could not be used to finance services or operations.

If the measure is approved, the bond proceeds could be leveraged by attracting private and public matching funds, including from state and federal sources.

"Vulnerable populations" includes extremely low income, very-low income or low-income:

  • individuals or families,
  • veterans,
  • youth,
  • seniors,
  • disabled people,
  • homeless individuals, chronically homeless individuals, or those at serious risk of becoming homeless, and
  • individuals suffering from mental health or substance abuse illnesses.

"Affordable housing" may include:

  • facilities for which assistance and services, such as mental health treatment, healthcare, drug and alcohol treatment, education, and job training may be provided by the City, other public entities, non-profit entities and/or private entities, and
  • infrastructure and landscaping, including utilitites, sidewalks, and streets that are directly related to and necessary for the acquisition, construction, or improvement of the affordable housing.

Affordable housing acquired or improved using bond funds could be sold or rented at below-market rates.

If approved, this measure would require the City to prepare a public report each year describing the amount of the funds collected and spent, and the status of any projects paid for with bond funds. The Council would establish a Citizens' Oversight Committee to review each annual report and would require an independent auditor to review the City's expenditure of bond funds.

If approved, the measure would allow a property tax increase to pay debt service on the bonds. The City estimates that the new property taxes to be paid by property owners during the first fiscal year after the sale of the first series of bonds will be approximately $3.14 per $100,000 of assessed value of taxable real property. The City estimates that the tax rate over the life of the bonds would range from approximately $3.14 per $100,000 of assessed value to $20.85 per $100,000 of assessed value of taxable real property.

This measure requires approval by two-thirds of the qualified voters of the City of San Diego who vote on the measure in order for it to be approved.

A "yes" vote would authorize the issuance and sale of up to $900,000,000 of general obligation bonds secured by new taxes on real property located within the City to provide affordable housing.

A "no" vote would not authorize the issuance and sale of the bonds or the related tax.

 

https://www.sandiego.gov/sites/default/files/impartialtitlesummaryfiscalcombined-november2020.pdf#page=3

Financial effect

Source: City of San Diego Independent Budget Analyst (IBA) / San Diego City Clerk

FISCAL IMPACT STATEMENT FOR CITY MEASURE ON NOVEMBER 3, 2020 BALLOT

MEASURE [A]: GENERAL OBLIGATION BONDS FOR AFFORDABLE HOUSING

This measure would authorize the City of San Diego to issue taxable or tax-xempt general obligation bonds (Bonds) in an amount not to exceed $900 million to provide permanent supportive and affordable housing within the City for vulnerable populations (Affordable Housing). Vulnerable populations include extremely low income, very-low income, and low-income individuals and families. These income thresholds are defined using federal standards and currently include households with zero income up to $92,400 for a family of four.

If approved, Bond proceeds (net issuance costs) will be used with other sources of affordable housing financing, to facilitate additional affordable and supportive homes. Bond proceeds may also be spent for facilities such as treatment, healthcare, education and job training, as well as landscaping and infrastructure directly related to Affordable Housing. Bond proceeds will not be used to finance services or operations, nor are they intended to entirely replace existing funding sources supporting Affordable Housing.

The San Diego Housing Commission (Commission) will administer the Bond proceeds. It reports to the City Council and will receive advice from a Citizens' Oversight Committee with relevant professional experience. The Commission will need additional staff to administer the Bond proceeds, at a cost of approximately $900,000 annually until all Bond proceeds have been utilized.

This measure also contains a provision that could result in a credit or reimbursement for certain developers/owners of real property who have either paid a separate fee supporting Affordable Housing or who elect, or have elected, to construct Affordable Housing. If this credit/reimbursement provision were to be approved by City Council, it would reduce other funds available for Affordable Housing, in an amount that cannot yet be determined.

Principal and interest payments on the Bonds (Debt Service), currently estimated at $2.1 billion over 46 years, would be assessed to owners of taxable real property in the City until all Bonds have matured. Debt Service assessments would be included in each property owner's annual property tax bill. The City preliminarily expects to issue Bonds annually for seven consecutive years beginning in 2022 (up to $900 million). Annual Debt Service assessments for property owners would increase with the issuance of each new Bond.

Assuming a $150 million 40-year taxable Bond is the first to be issued in 2022, the annual tax is estimated to be $3.14 per $100,000 of assessed property value, or $21.33 for a median value home in the City with an assessed valuation of $679,000. If additional $125 million 40-year taxable Bonds were to be issued in each of the next 6 years, to reach the maximum Bond authorization of $900 million, the annual tax would increase to $20.85 per $100,000 of assessed property value in 2028, or $141.54 annually for a $679,000 median value home in the City. These tax estimates are based on assumptions that are subject to change over time, including the assessed value of real property in the City, bond interest rates, bond terms, bond ratings, and the timing of bond issuances.

  

https://www.sandiego.gov/sites/default/files/impartialtitlesummaryfiscalcombined-november2020.pdf#page=6

Tax rate

Source: Full Text of Measure / San Diego City Clerk

A Municipal Special Election will be held in the City of San Diego, State of California (City) on November 3, 2020, to ask voters to authorize the sale of general obligation bonds of the City, in an amount not to exceed $900 million, to mitigate the City's housing crisis. Bond proceeds will be used to provide permanent supportive and affordable housing for vulnerable populations (Affordable Housing), which will help to reduce homelessness in the City. Bond proceeds will be used to assist "vulnerable populations," which includes: (1) extremely low income, or (2) very-low income, or (3) low-income individuals or families, veterans, youth, seniors, the disabled, the homeless or chronically homeless, those at serious risk of becoming homeless, and individuals suffering from mental health or substance abuse illnesses.

The Affordable Housing may include: (1) facilities for which assistance and services, such as mental health treatment, healthcare, drug and alcohol treatment, education, and job training may be provided by the City, other public entities, non-profit entities and/or private entities and (2) infrastructure and landscaping, including utilities, sidewalks, and streets that are directly related to and necessary for the acquisition, construction, or improvement of the Affordable Housing.

The proceeds of any bonds issued pursuant to this Bond Measure shall be applied only to these specific purposes.

If the Bond Measure is approved, the City expects to issue and sell the taxable or tax-exemp bonds in accordance with the Bond Law in multiple series over 7 years from the issuance date of the first series. Principal and interest on the bonds will be payable from the proceeds of taxes levied upon taxable property located within the City. The following information is provided in compliance with Sections 9400 to 9404 of the Elections Code of the State of California:

  • The best current estimate of the tax that would be required to be levied to fund this Bond Measure during the first fiscal year of the sale of the first series of bonds, based on estimated assessed valuations available at the time of filing of this statement, is $0.00314 per $100 ($3.14 per $100,000) of assessed valuation in fiscal year 2022.
  • The best current estimate of the tax that would be required to be levied to fund this Bond Measure during the first fiscal year of the sale of the last series of bonds, based no estimated assessed valuations available at the time of filing of this statement, is $0.02085 per $100 ($20.85 per $100,000) of assessed valuation in fiscal year 2028.
  • The best current estimate of the highest tax rate that would be required to be levied to fund this Bond Measure, based on estimated assessed valuations available at the time of filing of this statement, is $0.02085 per $100 ($20.85 per $100,000) of assessed valuation in fiscal years 2028 through 2062.
  • The best current estimate of the final fiscal year in which the tax is anticipated to be collected is 2068.
  • The best current estimate of the total debt service, including the principal and interest, that would be required to be repaid if all of the bonds are issued and sold is approximately $2.1 billion.

Voters are directed to the fact that the foregoing information is based upon the City's projections and estimates only, which are not binding upon the City. Further, voters should note that the above estimates do not account for impacts to the tax rate if the Subsequent Ordinance is adopted.

The estimates provided herein do not account for the taxes levied to pay for bonds issued by the City pursuant to the prior ballot measures approved by voters authorizing the issuance of bonds, if any.

Voters should note:

  • The actual tax rates and the years in which they will apply may vary from those presently estimated, due to variations from these estimates in the timing of bond sales, the amount of bonds sold at any given sale, market interest rates at the time of each bond sale, the credit quality of the City at the time each issue is sold, and actual assessed valuations of the real property being taxed over the term of repayment of the bonds, among other factors.
  • The actual dates of issuance and sale of the bonds and the amount sold at any given time will be governed by the Affordable Housing needs of the City, as the City may determine, through the Committee and the Housing Authority, and other factors.
  • The actual interest rates at which the bonds will be issued and sold will depend on the bond market at the time of each sale.
  • Actual future assessed valuations of the real property being taxed pursuant to this Bond Measure will depend upon the amount and value of taxable real property within the City as determined in the annual assessment and the equalization process conducted by the County of San Diego.

 

https://www.sandiego.gov/sites/default/files/ordinanceexaminationperiod.pdf#page=26

Published Arguments — Arguments for and against the ballot measure

Arguments FOR

Over 5,000 individuals in the city of San Diego are homeless.

There are homeless encampments in nearly every neighborhood in our city.

The growing crisis affects every neighborhood - impacting public health and safety and hurting local businesses. Everyone pays a daily price for our failure to address this human tragedy.

San Diego has tried various strategies to address this issue. But homelessness persists, and at times it seems as if there will never be a real solution.

Measure A is different. This local investment not only allows us to address homelessness, but also provides affordable homes so hard-working San Diego families can afford to stay in our city. It will also generate the local resources necessary to receive millions in federal and state matching funds that we currently leave on the table.

Your YES vote on Measure A will:

  • Create homes for local homeless children and their families living in shelters, on the streets or in danger of becoming homeless.
  • Provide homes for San Diegans experiencing chronic homelessness, where they can get supportive mential health services, drug and alcohol treatment, job training and placements.
  • Ensure families can afford housing and still have enough money for basics like food, transportation and childcare.
  • Create safe, clean and healthy homes for low-income seniors, veterans and those with disabilities.
  • Provide affordable homes near jobs for low-income families.
  • In the time of COVID, provide homes where those most vulnerable to infection can get the care they need for themselves and to protect others.
  • Create thousands of good-paying construction jobs to help our region rebound from the COVID-created economic crisis.

With Measure A, we can all do our part to help solve homelessness and keep San Diego affordable for all.

Vote YES on Measure A!

www.homesforsd.com

/signed/

TAMERA KOHLER
CEO, Regional Task Force on the Homeless

ELIZABETH R. CUESTAS
President & CEO, Casa Familiar,
affordable housing advocates

CHRIS WARD
San Diego City Councilmember,
Co-chair, Regional Task Force on the Homeless

DR. JIM DUNFORD
Former Director of Emergency Medical Services, City of San Diego
Professor Emeritus of Emergency Medicine, UC San Diego School of Medicine

DEACON JIM VARGAS
President & CEO, Father Joe's Villages

 

https://www.sandiego.gov/sites/default/files/ballotmeasureargumentsnovember2020.pdf

— Source: San Diego City Clerk's Office

Arguments AGAINST

No on Measure A: It's a Massive Property Tax Increase

In just the first five years under Measure A, the average homeowner will see their property tax increased by $500 or more! Taxpayers will be on the hook to pay for this property tax for more than 40 years!

San Diego already has the highest property tax rate in the county and too many working families are struggling with the high cost-of-living already. In the midst of a pandemic, San Diegans can't afford a massive property tax increase.

No on Measure A: It Lines the Pockets of Special Interests

Measure A fails to protect taxpayers by refusing to ban controversial Project Labor Agreements. These PLAs are sweetheart deals at taxpayer's expense that discriminate against non-union firms which are predominantly small, veteran-owned and minority-owned businesses.

No on Measure A: More Debt and a Waste of Taxpayer Money

Under Measure A, taxpayers will authorize city politicians to take on $900 million in additional debt at a cost of over $2 billion to city taxpayers!

Recent studies have shown the kinds of projects that would be funded by Measure A have been riddled with wasteful spending and financial mismanagement. A recent audit of similar projects in Los Angeles found that the well-connected developer's "soft costs," (e.g. consultants, fees, and financing) was unusually high and accounted for 35%-40% of the cost of each project funded by taxpayers.

For more information go to CleanUpCityHall.com

Join us in Voting No on Measure A

/signed/

CARL DEMAIO
Chairman
Reform California

CHRIS CATE
Chairman
San Diego Economic Development Committee

SCOTT SHERMAN
Chairman
San Diego Audit Committee

RICHARD RIDER
Chairman
San Diego Tax Fighters

 

https://www.sandiego.gov/sites/default/files/ballotmeasureargumentsnovember2020.pdf#page=3

— Source: San Diego City Clerk's Office

More information

Videos (1)

— October 4, 2020 League of Women Voters of San Diego
Ballot measures can sometimes feel like trick questions. We at the League of Women Voters are dedicated to providing non-partisan "prop talks" to help break down each measure. We will present the pros and cons of how these policies will impact your day to day life.

Contact Info

Yes on Measure A
Yes on Measure A - Homes for San Diegans, Sponsored by a Coalition of Civic Nonprofits and Housing Providers
No on Measure A
Reform California FPPC ID #1268914
Phone: 619-786-8019
Address:
PO Box 27227
San Diego, CA 92198
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Yes on Measure A

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No on Measure A

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