Voter's Edge California Voter Guide
Get the facts before you vote.
Brought to you by
MapLight
League of Women Voters of California Education Fund
November 3, 2020 — California General Election
Invest in unbiased information

With your support, we can reach and inform more voters.

Donate now to spread the word.

State of California
Proposition 22 — Rideshare and Delivery Drivers Initiative Statute - Majority Approval Required

To learn more about measures, follow the links for each tab in this section. For most screenreaders, you can hit Return or Enter to enter a tab and read the content within.

EXEMPTS APP-BASED TRANSPORTATION AND DELIVERY COMPANIES FROM PROVIDING EMPLOYEE BENEFITS TO CERTAIN DRIVERS. INITIATIVE STATUTE.

Classifies app-based drivers as "independent contractors," instead of "employees," and provides independent-contractor drivers other compensation, unless certain criteria are met.

Fiscal impact: Minor increase in state income taxes paid by rideshare and delivery company drivers and investors.

Put on the Ballot by Petition Signatures 

What is this proposal?

Easy Voter Guide — Summary for new and busy voters

Information provided by The League of Women Voters of California Education Fund

The way it is now

An independent contractor can choose when, where and how much to work. An employee has their schedule and work set by their employer. Employees get benefits and protections that independent contractors do not. These include minimum wage, overtime pay and paid time off if they are sick.

Rideshare and delivery apps include companies such as Uber, Lyft and DoorDash. These companies currently hire drivers as independent contractors. A 2019 state law requires rideshare and delivery companies to hire drivers as employees instead of as independent contractors. The state attorney general and three cities are suing Uber and Lyft for refusing to follow the state’s new law.

What if it passes?

Rideshare and delivery drivers would stay as independent contractors. Rideshare and delivery companies would have to pay drivers 20 percent more than the local minimum wage for time spent driving. These companies would have to help pay health insurance costs for contractors who drive more than 15 hours per week and pay medical costs when a driver is injured while working. Prop 22 would also limit cities and counties from putting new rules on rideshare and delivery companies.

Budget effect

Prop 22 would lead to small increases in income tax paid by rideshare and delivery company drivers. By keeping drivers as independent contractors, rideshare and delivery companies would likely earn higher profits.

People FOR say

  • Rideshare and delivery drivers want to work as independent contractors, not employees.
  • Forcing companies to hire drivers as employees would get rid of hundreds of thousands of jobs.

People AGAINST say

  • Rideshare and delivery companies don’t want to pay drivers basic benefits.
  • Treating drivers as employees will make sure they get paid sick leave and unemployment benefits.

Pros & Cons — Unbiased explanation with arguments for and against

Information provided by League of Women Voters of California Education Fund

The Question

Should app-based rideshare and delivery drivers be classified as independent contractors (not employees) and should rideshare and delivery companies be required to adopt labor and wage policies unique to these drivers?

The Situation

Rideshare and delivery companies allow customers to hire rides or have food delivered using a phone app. Between 800,000 and 950,000 Californians provide rides or deliveries each year. Drivers choose when and where to work, but provide their own vehicle and cover vehicle expenses. Most drivers work part-time and make between $11 and $16 per hour.

Rideshare and delivery companies hire drivers as independent contractors: people who do work for a business but are not employees. Independent contractors are not entitled to legal protections and benefits required for employees—including minimum wage, overtime, unemployment insurance, and workers’ compensation.

In 2019 lawmakers passed AB 5, limiting the ability of companies to hire workers as independent contractors. Under AB 5, rideshare and delivery drivers are classified as employees rather than independent contractors. Rideshare and delivery companies must provide employee protections and benefits to drivers. The state Attorney General sued two rideshare companies after the companies continued to hire drivers as independent contractors.

The Proposal

Prop 22 would reclassify app-based drivers as independent contractors, not employees, unless a company: sets a driver’s hours, requires drivers to accept certain rides or deliveries, or restricts working for other companies. Drivers would not receive employee benefits and protections—including minimum wage, overtime, unemployment insurance, and workers’ compensation.

Instead, this proposition would require companies to provide the following benefits to drivers:

  • Minimum Compensation: Prop 22 would require app- based companies to pay at least 120 percent of the minimum wage for each hour spent driving.
  • Healthcare Subsidy: The measure would require rideshare and delivery companies to provide a health insurance stipend to drivers.
  • Medical Expenses: The measure would require rideshare and delivery companies to buy insurance to cover medical expenses when a driver is injured while driving.
  • Rest Policy: The measure would restrict drivers from working more than 12 hours a day for a rideshare or delivery company.
  • Other Requirements: This measure would prohibit workplace discrimination and require that companies develop sexual harassment policies, conduct criminal background checks, and mandate safety training for drivers.

Prop 22 would also prevent local jurisdictions from setting their own rules for rideshare and delivery companies, such as setting a higher minimum compensation.

Fiscal effect

  • Lower Costs and Higher Profits for Rideshare and Delivery Companies: Companies would not have to pay the costs of providing employee protections and benefits that are currently required under AB 5 and could afford to charge lower fares and fees, increasing the company’s profit.
  • Drivers and Stockholders Would Pay More Income Taxes: Because rides and orders would increase, drivers would earn more income. State income taxes paid by drivers would increase. Because companies would earn higher profits, Californians who own company stock may earn higher income and pay more in income tax.
  • The amount of increased state personal income tax paid by drivers and stockholders is unknown, but likely minor.

Supporters say

  • Classifying drivers as employees as required under AB 5 would lead to longer wait times, higher prices, and less access to rideshare and delivery services.
  • Like AB 5, Prop 22 would improve delivery and rideshare work by requiring companies to provide new benefits and expand public safety protections.

Opponents say

  • Prop 22 would eliminate basic workplace protections and replace them with lower guaranteed earnings and healthcare subsidies to save costs for the company.
  • Current law does not limit driver flexibility. A majority of drivers work 30 or more hours per week.

Measure Details — Official information about this measure

YES vote means

A YES vote on this measure means: App-based rideshare and delivery companies could hire drivers as independent contractors. Drivers could decide when, where, and how much to work but would not get standard benefits and protections that businesses must provide employees.

NO vote means

A NO vote on this measure means: App-based rideshare and delivery companies would have to hire drivers as employees if the courts say that a recent state law makes drivers employees. Drivers would then have less choice about when, where, and how much to work but would get standard benefits and protections that businesses must provide employees.

Summary

Source: California Attorney General's Office - Official Voter Information Guide p. 56

OFFICIAL TITLE AND SUMMARY
PREPARED BY THE ATTORNEY GENERAL 

PROPOSITION 22.
CHANGES EMPLOYMENT CLASSIFICATION RULES FOR APP-BASED TRANSPORTATION AND DELIVERY DRIVERS. INITIATIVE STATUTE.

  • Classifies drivers for app-based transportation (rideshare) and delivery companies as “independent contractors,” not “employees,” unless company: sets drivers’ hours, requires acceptance of specific ride or delivery requests, or restricts working for other companies.
  • Independent contractors are not covered by various state employment laws—including minimum wage, overtime, unemployment insurance, and workers’ compensation.
  • Instead, independent-contractor drivers would be entitled to other compensation—including minimum earnings, healthcare subsidies, and vehicle insurance.
  • Restricts certain local regulation of app-based drivers.
  • Criminalizes impersonation of drivers. 

SUMMARY OF LEGISLATIVE ANALYST’S ESTIMATE OF NET STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENT FISCAL IMPACT:

  • Minor increase in state income taxes paid by rideshare and delivery company drivers and investors. 

https://vig.cdn.sos.ca.gov/2020/general/pdf/complete-vig.pdf#page=56

Background

Source: California Legislative Analyst's Office - Official Voter Information Guide p. 56

BACKGROUND

App-Based Rides and Delivery. Some companies allow customers to hire rides or order food for delivery on a phone app. These companies are often called rideshare and delivery companies. Most large rideshare and delivery companies are headquartered in California. In total, these companies are worth about as much as Ford, General Motors, and Fiat Chrysler combined.

Rideshare and Delivery Companies Hire Drivers as Independent Contractors. An independent contractor is someone who does work for a business but is not an employee of the business. Drivers for rideshare and delivery companies choose when, where, and how much to work. Drivers use their own cars and pay their own expenses.

Most Drivers Work Part Time. Most drivers work part time and many drivers only work for a short time or only drive occasionally. Rideshare and delivery companies pay drivers a share of the fare or delivery charge customers pay for app-based services. Drivers spend about one-third of their time waiting for rides and deliveries and are not paid during this time. Most drivers probably make between $11 and $16 per hour, after accounting for waiting time and driving expenses.

The State Says Rideshare and Delivery Companies Must Hire Drivers as Employees. The state recently passed a law that limits the ability of companies to hire workers as independent contractors. The state Attorney General says the law means rideshare and delivery companies must hire drivers as employees. The rideshare and delivery companies do not agree that the new state law makes their drivers employees. The companies continue to hire drivers as independent contractors. The state Attorney General recently sued two rideshare companies to force them to hire drivers as employees. If the courts agree with the Attorney General, the companies will have to hire drivers as employees.

As Employees, Drivers Would Get Standard Benefits and Protections. As employees, drivers would get standard job benefits and protections that independent contractors do not get. For example, employees must be paid at least a minimum wage plus extra pay for overtime. Employees also must be allowed to take breaks and take paid time off if they are sick. At the same time, as employees, drivers would have less choice about when, where, and how much to work.

https://vig.cdn.sos.ca.gov/2020/general/pdf/complete-vig.pdf#page=56

Impartial analysis / Proposal

Source: California Legislative Analyst's Office - Official Voter Information Guide p. 57

PROPOSAL

Makes Drivers Independent Contractors. This measure makes app-based rideshare and delivery drivers independent contractors. The new state law that limits the ability of companies to hire independent contractors would not apply to drivers.

Gives Drivers Certain Benefits. This measure requires rideshare and delivery companies to provide certain benefits: 

  • Earnings Minimum. This measure requires companies to pay 120 percent of the local minimum wage for each hour a driver spends driving, but not time spent waiting.
  • Health Insurance Stipend. For drivers who normally work more than 15 hours per week (not including waiting time), this measure requires that companies help pay for health insurance.
  • Pay For Costs When a Driver Gets Hurt on the Job. This measure requires that companies pay medical costs and replace some lost income when a driver is injured while driving or waiting.
  • Rest Policy. This measure prohibits drivers from working more than 12 hours in a 24-hour period for a single rideshare or delivery company. 
  • Other Requirements.This measure prohibits workplace discrimination and requires that companies: (1) develop sexual harassment policies, (2) conduct criminal background checks, and (3) mandate safety training for drivers.

Limits Local Government Ability to Set Additional Rules. This measure limits the ability of cities and counties to place additional rules on rideshare and delivery companies.

https://vig.cdn.sos.ca.gov/2020/general/pdf/complete-vig.pdf#page=57

Financial effect

Source: California Legislative Analyst's Office - Official Voter Information Guide p. 57

FISCAL EFFECTS

Whether rideshare and delivery drivers are employees or independent contractors is still being decided in the courts. The fiscal effects below assume that the courts agree with the state that drivers are employees under the new state law. 

Lower Costs and Higher Profits for Rideshare and Delivery Companies. This measure allows rideshare and delivery companies to hire drivers as independent contractors instead of employees. The companies would not have to pay the costs of providing standard employee benefits and protections, which usually make up 20 percent of employee costs. This would allow the companies to charge lower fares and delivery fees. With lower prices, customers would take more rides and place more orders. This could increase the companies’ profits. Higher profits would increase the companies’ stock prices.

Drivers and Stockholders Would Pay More Income Taxes. Because people would take more rides and place more orders, drivers as a group would earn more income. This means state income taxes paid by drivers would increase. Californians who own rideshare and delivery company stock also may earn more when they sell the stock. They would pay state income taxes on these increased gains. The amount of increased state personal income taxes paid by drivers and stockholders is unknown, but likely minor.

SUMMARY OF FISCAL EFFECTS

This measure would have the following fiscal effect:

  • Minor increase in state income taxes paid by rideshare and delivery company drivers and investors.

https://vig.cdn.sos.ca.gov/2020/general/pdf/complete-vig.pdf#page=57


Published Arguments — Arguments for and against the ballot measure

Arguments FOR

Arguments are the opinions of the authors, and have not been checked for accuracy by any official agency.

YES on 22 PROTECTS app-based drivers' choice to be independent contractors—by 4:1 margin drivers support independence!

  • SAVES rideshare, delivery services & hundreds of thousands of jobs
  • PROVIDES drivers new benefits, earnings guarantee
  • STRENGTHENS public safety
  • ENDORSED by overwhelming majority of drivers, community, public safety, small business groups
  • VoteYesProp22.com

FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION FOR:
YES on 22—Save App-Based Jobs & Services
(877) 581-8711
info@protectdriversandservices.com
www.VoteYesProp22.com

— Source: California Secretary of State / Official Voter Information Guide

Arguments FOR

Arguments are the opinions of the authors, and have not been checked for accuracy by any official agency. 

ARGUMENT IN FAVOR OF PROPOSITION 22

PROBLEM: DRASTIC NEW LEGISLATION THREATENS TO MAKE IT ILLEGAL FOR APP-BASED DRIVERS TO WORK AS INDEPENDENT CONTRACTORS

Sacramento politicians recently passed legislation that threatens to eliminate the ability of Californians to choose work as independent contractors providing app-based rideshare, food and grocery delivery services.

By a 4:1 margin, independent surveys show app-based drivers overwhelmingly prefer to work as independent contractors, not employees. These drivers have other jobs, family obligations or health issues and need flexibility to continue this work and supplemental income to support their families. 

PROHIBITING INDEPENDENT CONTRACT WORK FOR APP-BASED DRIVERS WOULD ELIMINATE HUNDREDS OF THOUSANDS OF JOBS 

"Eliminating drivers' ability to work as independent contractors will end the flexibility the vast majority of drivers need, severely damaging the proven on-demand model that quickly matches customers with drivers. The result will be much longer wait times, significantly higher consumer prices, and the permanent shutdown of services in many areas—eliminating hundreds of thousands of jobs."—William Hamm, former nonpartisan State Legislative Analyst

SOLUTION: YES ON PROP. 22 PROTECTS THE ABILITY OF DRIVERS TO WORK AS INDEPENDENT CONTRACTORS & PROVIDES NEW BENEFITS 

YES ON 22: 

1. PROTECTS the choice of app-based drivers to work as independent contractors—SAVING CALIFORNIA JOBS when millions are struggling financially.

2. IMPROVES app-based work by requiring companies to provide new benefits, including: guaranteed minimum earnings • funding for health benefits • medical and disability coverage for on-the-job injuries • additional protections against harassment and discrimination.

3. CREATES EXPANDED PUBLIC SAFETY PROTECTIONS, including: requiring ongoing background checks and safety courses • zero tolerance for drug and alcohol offenses • criminal penalty for impersonating a driver.

YES ON 22: BY A 4:1 MARGIN APP-BASED DRIVERS WANT TO BE INDEPENDENT 

More than 80% of drivers work less than 20 hours a week, have other jobs or responsibilities and can't work set shifts as employees: • Parents who work while kids are in school; • Family members who work odd hours so they can care for aging parents or other loved ones; • Working families, retirees and students who need supplemental income.

"I'm a disabled veteran and am going back to school to prepare for a new career. I strongly support Prop. 22 because it protects the flexibility I need to work around my medical appointments and my education."—Matthew Emerson, Navy Veteran & Food Delivery Driver 

"I'm a mother of five with a full-time job. I need flexible, independent work a few hours a week to supplement my income. Otherwise my family wouldn't survive financially." —Brenda Vela, Mother & Rideshare Driver

YES ON PROP. 22 KEEPS RIDESHARE & FOOD DELIVERY SERVICES AVAILABLE, AFFORDABLE & SAFE

Prop. 22 preserves delivery services that millions now rely on to bring groceries, medications and warm meals to homes, and rideshare that improves mobility and keeps drunk drivers off our roads.

YES ON 22: SUPPORTED BY DRIVERS, SMALL BUSINESSES, SOCIAL JUSTICE ADVOCATES, PUBLIC SAFETY LEADERS & OTHERS

Supported by an overwhelming majority of app-based drivers • California Small Business Association • California State NAACP • California Peace Officers’ Association • National Hispanic Council on Aging • California Senior Advocates League • 100+ other organizations.

www.VoteYesProp22.com

BETTY JO TOCCOLI, President
California Small Business Association

JIM PYATT, President 
Independent Drivers Alliance of California

MINNIE HADLEY-HEMPSTEAD, President
NAACP Los Angeles

https://vig.cdn.sos.ca.gov/2020/general/pdf/complete-vig.pdf#page=58

— Source: California Secretary of State - Official Voter Information Guide pp. 58-59

Arguments AGAINST

Arguments are the opinions of the authors, and have not been checked for accuracy by any official agency.

No on 22 stops billion-dollar app companies like Uber, Lyft, and DoorDash from writing their own exemption to California law and profiting from it. 22 denies their drivers rights and safety protections they deserve: sick leave, healthcare and unemployment. Companies profit; exploited drivers lose rights and protections. Vote NO.

FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION AGAINST:
No on Prop 22, Slam the Brakes on Uber, Lyft and DoorDash
600 Grand Avenue #410
Oakland, CA 94610
(213) 537-4863
info@nooncaprop22.com
nooncaprop22.com

— Source: California Secretary of State / Official Voter Information Guide

Arguments AGAINST

Arguments are the opinions of the authors, and have not been checked for accuracy by any official agency. 

ARGUMENT AGAINST PROPOSITION 22

Uber, Lyft, and DoorDash paid to put Proposition 22 on the November ballot. They hired lawyers to write this misleading initiative and paid political operatives millions to collect the voter signatures needed.

Why? 

To create a special exemption for themselves that will legally deny their driver's basic rights and protections at work like paid sick leave; workers' compensation, or unemployment benefits.

Prop. 22 ONLY applies to Uber, Lyft, DoorDash, and other app-based delivery and transportation companies. Their goal is PROFIT. Only THESE companies would profit from this special exemption.

Current law requires Uber, Lyft, and DoorDash to provide their drivers with a minimum wage, healthcare, paid sick leave, unemployment, and workers' compensation coverage, just like every other California business.

The Attorney General recently sued them for breaking the law and for relentlessly avoiding responsibility to their drivers for years. With your vote, you can help make them stop! Vote NO on Prop. 22. 

Why vote NO on Proposition 22? 

Prop. 22 creates a special exemption that eliminates basic workplace benefits and replaces them with a new LOWER "earnings guarantee" and "healthcare subsidy" payments designed to save the companies money. 

Prop. 22 contains deceptive wording to cynically try to convince us they are strengthening driver protections. The truth is, Uber and Lyft are ALREADY required to perform background checks, and the new provisions would ELIMINATE required sexual harassment training and the obligations on Uber and Lyft to investigate customers’ and drivers’ sexual harassment claims.

The bottom line: Prop. 22 is all about money. It's not about helping the drivers you meet if you use these apps.

The outbreak of COVID-19 further exposed these companies' refusal to treat their drivers fairly. 

The New York Times editorial board recently wrote that these companies "have failed to enforce consistent safety measures during the pandemic, including providing sufficient numbers of masks or guidance on social distancing, while pushing workers to fulfill an ever greater number of orders to keep up with the rising demand for food deliveries."

These drivers, 78% of whom are people of color, are ESSENTIAL. They've helped California through the pandemic, and they deserve better. 

We believe app drivers, many Latino, Black, or from other communities of color, SHOULD have sick leave, healthcare, unemployment benefits, AND flexibility in their scheduling. 

So don't let Uber, Lyft, and DoorDash confuse the issue. They claim this is about "flexibility" for "part-time" drivers. However, current law in no way limits driver flexibility.

In fact, a University of California study found that a majority of drivers are not part-time, and over 70 percent of drivers for Uber and Lyft work 30 or more hours per week. 

Don't take our word. Read for yourself at transform.ucsc.edu/on-demand-and-on-the-edge.

Prop. 22 was written by Uber, Lyft, and DoorDash for Uber, Lyft, and DoorDash, NOT their drivers. That's why tens of thousands of drivers have joined us to urge a NO vote. 

Don't let Uber, Lyft, and DoorDash write their own special law. 

Vote No on Proposition 22. 

NOonCAProp22.com

ALVARO BOLAINEZ, Uber Driver

NOURBESE FLINT, Executive Director
Black Women for Wellness Action Project

ART PULASKI, Executive Secretary-Treasurer
California Labor Federation

https://vig.cdn.sos.ca.gov/2020/general/pdf/complete-vig.pdf#page=59

— Source: California Secretary of State - Official Voter Information Guide pp. 58-59

Replies to Arguments FOR

Arguments are the opinions of the authors, and have not been checked for accuracy by any official agency. 

REBUTTAL TO ARGUMENT IN FAVOR OF PROPOSITION 22 

My name is Jerome Gage. I've been a Lyft driver for five years. I like the flexibility. Before COVID-19, I drove 40 hours a week. I drive less now but understand why.

What I don't understand is why Uber and Lyft refuse to treat me as an employee since that's California law.

Right now, they don't pay minimum wage or overtime. They don't give us paid sick time. They shift the cost of doing business onto us. That's wrong.

Vote NO on 22. 

They also don't think I deserve healthcare or protections of an "essential" employee. When COVID-19 hit, they wouldn't even cover my unemployment benefits. 

But they paid $5,000,000 to put 22 on the ballot. And they say they'll spend another ONE HUNDRED MILLION to pass it. 

Drivers like me would've used that money for PPE or more sanitation stations to protect us and keep our customers safe. If we got sick, we'd even have healthcare.

Uber and Lyft claim I want to be "independent." What I really want is to be safe and paid a living wage. That would give me independence.

Recent studies show 70% of Uber and Lyft drivers work 30 or more hours a week—just like me—and our wages would be WORSE under Prop. 22. How's that fair?

Billion-dollar companies shouldn't get to pick and choose the laws they follow or write their own, like Prop. 22. 

Please join me and driver groups representing over 50,000 drivers: VOTE NO on Prop. 22. 

Jerome Gage, Lyft Driver

https://vig.cdn.sos.ca.gov/2020/general/pdf/complete-vig.pdf#page=58

— Source: California Secretary of State - Official Voter Information Guide pp. 58-59

Replies to Arguments AGAINST

Arguments are the opinions of the authors, and have not been checked for accuracy by any official agency. 

REBUTTAL TO ARGUMENT AGAINST PROPOSITION 22 

APP-BASED DRIVERS OVERWHELMINGLY SUPPORT PROPOSITION 22 

By a 4:1 margin, surveys show app-based drivers want to work as independent contractors. Eighty percent work under 20 hours per week, and a majority work under 10 hours per week. Parents who need flexible work around kids' schedules, people in need of extra income, families caring for sick or aging loved ones, and students earning around classes. 

But the politicians and special interests behind the opposition to Prop. 22 cynically claim they know what's best for drivers. They passed state legislation that threatens to make it illegal for drivers to work as independent contractors. 

That's why drivers support Prop. 22—to protect their flexible earning opportunities and save hundreds of thousands of jobs. 

PROP. 22 SAVES APP-BASED JOBS & SERVICES

Prop. 22 protects drivers’ choice to work as independent contractors. Prop. 22 preserves delivery services that millions rely on for safe access to food and groceries and rideshare that improves mobility and keeps drunk drivers off our roads. 

PROP. 22 REQUIRES COMPANIES TO PROVIDE DRIVERS HISTORIC NEW BENEFITS

• Earnings guarantee of at least $21 per hour. 

• Health care benefits at 15 hours per week. 

• Insurance for injuries on the job. 

• Strengthening protections against discrimination and harassment. 

PROP. 22 ADDS STRICT NEW CONSUMER SAFETY PROTECTIONS

Prop. 22 provides for: strict ongoing driver background checks • zero tolerance for drug and alcohol offenses • making it a crime to impersonate a driver. 

JOIN APP-BASED DRIVERS, SOCIAL JUSTICE, SMALL BUSINESS & PUBLlC SAFETY LEADERS: YES ON 22! 

www.VoteYesProp22.com

JIM PYATT, President
Independent Drivers Alliance of California

FREDDYE DAVIS, President
Hayward South Alameda County NAACP

JULIAN CANETE, President
California Hispanic Chambers of Commerce

https://vig.cdn.sos.ca.gov/2020/general/pdf/complete-vig.pdf#page=59

— Source: California Secretary of State - Official Voter Information Guide pp. 58-59

Who gave money?

Contributions

Yes on Proposition 22

Total money raised: $203,272,700
Bar graph showing total amount relative to total amount for this entire campaign.

No on Proposition 22

Total money raised: $20,204,043
Bar graph showing total amount relative to total amount for this entire campaign.

Below are the top 10 contributors that gave money to committees supporting or opposing the ballot measures.

Yes on Proposition 22

1
Uber Technologies
$57,344,469
2
DoorDash
$51,899,375
3
Lyft
$48,937,462
4
Instacart
$31,581,793
5
Postmates
$13,319,307
6
COMMITTEE ON JOBS GOVERNMENT REFORM FUND
$180,000
7
HOPSKIPDRIVE, INC
$8,937
8
GOLD RUSH ADVERTISING
$1,080
9
KILEY FOR ASSEMBLY 2020
$200

No on Proposition 22

1
California Labor Federation
$2,272,065
2
International Brotherhood of Teamsters
$1,500,000
2
SEIU Local 721
$1,500,000
3
SEIU Local 1021
$1,074,467
4
SEIU United Healthcare Workers West
$1,000,000
4
Service Employees International Union
$1,000,000
4
UFCW Local 770
$1,000,000
4
United Food and Commercial Workers International Union (UFCW)
$1,000,000
5
State Building & Construction Trades Council of California
$750,000
5
UFCW Western States Council
$750,000

More information about contributions

Yes on Proposition 22

By State:

California 100.00%
100.00%

By Size:

Large contributions (100.00%)
Small contributions (0.00%)
100.00%

By Type:

From organizations (100.00%)
From individuals (0.00%)
100.00%

No on Proposition 22

By State:

California 71.98%
District of Columbia 23.87%
New York 1.89%
Kansas 0.99%
Other 1.28%
71.98%23.87%

By Size:

Large contributions (99.97%)
Small contributions (0.03%)
99.97%

By Type:

From organizations (99.47%)
From individuals (0.53%)
99.47%

More information

Videos (6)

Prop 22 would allow app-based companies in California such as Uber, Lyft and DoorDash to maintain drivers as independent contractors, giving them some but not all of the rights that employees have under state labor laws.
— October 4, 2020 League of Women Voters of San Diego
Ballot measures can sometimes feel like trick questions. We at the League of Women Voters are dedicated to providing non-partisan "prop talks" to help break down each measure. We will present the pros and cons of how these policies will impact your day to day life.
— October 1, 2020 Los Angeles Times
If Proposition 22 passes, it would allow companies like Uber and Lyft to continue to consider their workers as independent contractors, as opposed to full-time employees.
Si se aprueba la Proposición 22, permitiría a empresas como Uber y Lyft seguir considerando a sus trabajadores como contratistas independientes, a diferencia de los empleados a tiempo completo.
— October 12, 2020 League of Women Voters of Cupertino-Sunnyvale
This video covers all 12 Propositions, Measure 22 starts at time: 33:23
— October 18, 2020 League of Women Voters of Southwest Santa Clara Valley

Events (5)

Contact Info

Yes on Proposition 22
YES on 22—Save App-Based Jobs & Services
Phone: (877) 581-8711
No on Proposition 22
No on Prop 22, Slam the Brakes on Uber, Lyft and DoorDash
Email info@nooncaprop22.com
Phone: (213) 537-4863
Address:
600 Grand Avenue #410
Oakland, CA 94610
Use tabs to select your choice. Use return to create a choice. You can access your choices by navigating to 'My Choices'.

Get the Easy Voter Guide for this measure in these languages

Who supports or opposes this measure?

Yes on Proposition 22

Organizations (111)

Elected & Appointed Officials (0)
No on Proposition 22

Organizations (97)

Elected & Appointed Officials (138)

Please share this site to help others research their voting choices.

PUBLISHING:PRODUCTION SERVER:PRODUCTION