Voter’s Edge California
Get the facts before you vote.
Brought to you by
MapLight
League of Women Voters of California Education Fund
March 3, 2020 — Primary Election
We depend on your support.
Share your knowledge

Text VOTE to 52000 to donate $10.

Do you feel better informed having used Voter's Edge?

Help us inform other voters.

Special District

Jefferson Union High School District
Measure J - 55% Approval Required

To learn more about measures, follow the links for each tab in this section. For most screenreaders, you can hit Return or Enter to enter a tab and read the content within.

To continue to repair, upgrade and construct classrooms, administration centers and educational facilities at Jefferson, Oceana, Terra Nova, Thornton, Westmoor and Adult-Ed High Schools; shall Jefferson Union High School District's measure to reauthorize as new bonds $28.39 million of bonds approved by voters in 2014 with legal rates, estimated average annual levies less than $0.01 per $100 of assessed valuation while bonds are outstanding (generating $1.9 million dollars /year), annual audits and independent oversight be approved?

What is this proposal?

Measure Details — Official information about this measure

Impartial analysis / Proposal

The California Constitution and Education Code authorize a school district to issue bonds for specified purposes if voters approve the issuance of the bonds at an election. Pursuant to Education Code Section 15274, such a bond measure passes if 55% of those voting on it approve it.

The Board of Trustees of the Jefferson Union High School District (the “District”) proposes this Measure, which would authorize the District to issue bonds in a principal amount not to exceed $28.39 million. The bonds will have an interest rate not exceeding the legal maximum and will be repaid within the time permitted by law. The Tax Rate Statement printed in this pamphlet contains the District’s best estimates of tax rates required to service the bond debt during the life of the bonds, which is estimated to be approximately 25 years. The District’s best estimate of the average annual tax rate levy to fund this bond is $6.00 per $100,000 of assessed valuation.This means that, for example,a property assessed at $700,000 would likely have an annual tax obligation of $42.00 under this Measure. The District estimates that the total amount repayable during the life of the bond, including principal and interest, is approximately $48 million.

The California Constitution requires the listing of specific school facilities projects to be funded from the bond revenue and certification that the District governing board has evaluated safety, class size reduction, and information technology needs in the development of that list. The District’s list of projects covered by the bond is attached to the full text of the Measure and includes, without limitation: removing toxic substances; ensuring health, safety, and accessibility compliance; upgrading, renovating, repairing or replacing plumbing systems,electrical systems,classroom interiors and exteriors,HVAC systems,roofs and gutters,athletic facilities and play fields; improving energy efficiency; expanding and upgrading other student support facilities; and acquiring and constructing new facilities like science and computer labs,a new district administration center,classrooms,and additional student support facilities.

The Measure authorizes equipment acquisition, upgrades, repairs, services, construction, and other items related to these listed projects. Projects are authorized at all District locations. The Project List should be reviewed for further details. No funds from this tax shall be used for administrator salaries or operating expenses.

State law requires the District to take certain steps to account for the proceeds from the bonds. Accordingly, the District will direct the funds to be deposited into a special account, appoint an independent citizens’ oversight committee, conduct annual independent performance and financial audits to ensure that funds are spent only on the listed improvements and for no other purposes, and prepare annual reports listing the amount of funds collected and expended and the status of any funded project.

A “yes” vote on this Measure would authorize the District to issue bonds in a principal amount not to exceed $28.39 million for the purposes listed in the Project List.

A “no” vote would prevent the District from issuing the bonds.

The measure passes if 55% of those voting on the measure vote "yes." 

 

 

Published Arguments — Arguments for and against the ballot measure

Arguments FOR

Vote YES on Measure J!

In 2014, Jefferson Union High School District voters overwhelmingly passed a general obligation bond to improve and protect our communities' most important assets - our local high schools. Because of your support, improvements have been made in repairing, rehabilitating and upgrading Jefferson, Oceana, Terra Nova, Thornton, and Westmoor High Schools.

Measure J will allow us to continue the job of improving our local schools by reauthorizing $28.39 million of previously approved bonds. This can be done without increasing the District's total authorized debt, while at the same time saving taxpayers millions of dollars and guaranteeing significant taxpayer protections. 

School Repair and Student Safety: Measure J will allow us to continue improving our schools by:

* Making student safety improvements, including upgrading fire alarms, sprinkler systems and fire suppression systems and installing improved fencing, gates, and intrusion alarms.

* Renovating and replacing outdated plumbing, heating, and electrical systems

* Complying with Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) standards, including for stairs, ramps, parking, sidewalks, and restrooms

* Repairing and replacing roofs, gutters, and drains

* Constructing and upgrading science and computer labs

* Constructing a new district administration center for student registration and teacher training

* Providing new classrooms, including vocational classrooms to reduce student overcrowding

Taxpayer Protections: Measure J will protect taxpayers by:

* Requiring annual audits and independent taxpayer oversight of the funds

* Prohibiting funds from going to administrators' salaries, pensions, or benefits

* Imposing tough legal safeguards requiring all monies to be spent on our local high schools and not taken by the State and used elsewhere

Vote YES on Measure J

To improve our local schools, upgrade student and classroom safety, and enhance property values and home prices, please join parents, teachers, grandparents, guardians, neighbors, business owners, and community leaders in voting YES on Measure J! 

/s/ Andrew Lie, JUHSD Board President

/s/ Mike O'Neill, Former Pacifica Mayor

/s/ Thomas Nuris, Retired JUHSD Board Member

/s/ Mary Bier, Pacifica Councilmember

/s/ David V. Tejada, 50+ Year Daly City Resident 

Arguments AGAINST

Arguments AGAINST

How greedy can you get?

In 2014, voters approved $133,000,000 in debt to "continue to renovate" and in 2006 they approved $136,900,000 in additional debt to "renovate/upgrade facilities" and "upgrade technology."

Now they want another $23,390,000 to do the same things all over again???

Do schools reallay need upgrading every four to six years?

Have they even spent the $133,000,000 from the 2014 bond or the $136,900,000 from 2006?

If not, why are they asking for more of your hard-earned tax dollars?

When bond debt measures like Measure J are put efore the voters, they are admitting that everything they are currently spending your tax dollars on now is more important than the projects for which this tax increase is being sought.

Budgets set priorities.  Jefferson High School District is saying every educational dollar spent today is going to a higher priority than to "repair ... classrooms."

Do you agree?

The website: www.ed-data.org shows at least 4,869 students in the district which means this bond expense is $5,830 per student on top of the $13,305 per student expenses already in the budget. That budget is also above the statewide average.

Would you take out a 25-30 year loan to buy a personal computer? Nuts, right? But that's what the District did in 2014. They issued bond debt to purchase technology that is now obsolete.

You deserved to know the full truth about Measure J.

If you value children's health and safety more than funding tax free shelters for bond funds and big banks, then vote NO on Measure J.

If you value school maintenance more than make principal and interest payments for 25-30 years, vote NO on Measure J.

Remember, financing school projects via bonds, routinely doubles the cost of the project.

For more information: www.SVTaxpayers.org

/s/ Mark W.A. Hinkle

Replies to Arguments FOR

How greedy can you get?

In 2014, voters approved $133,000,000 in debt to "continue to renovate" and in 2006 they approved $136,900,000 in additional debt to "renovate/upgrade facilities" and "upgrade technology."

Now they want another $23,390,000 to do the same things all over again???

Do schools reallay need upgrading every four to six years?

Have they even spent the $133,000,000 from the 2014 bond or the $136,900,000 from 2006?

If not, why are they asking for more of your hard-earned tax dollars?

When bond debt measures like Measure J are put efore the voters, they are admitting that everything they are currently spending your tax dollars on now is more important than the projects for which this tax increase is being sought.

Budgets set priorities.  Jefferson High School District is saying every educational dollar spent today is going to a higher priority than to "repair ... classrooms."

Do you agree?

The website: www.ed-data.org shows at least 4,869 students in the district which means this bond expense is $5,830 per student on top of the $13,305 per student expenses already in the budget. That budget is also above the statewide average.

Would you take out a 25-30 year loan to buy a personal computer? Nuts, right? But that's what the District did in 2014. They issued bond debt to purchase technology that is now obsolete.

You deserved to know the full truth about Measure J.

If you value children's health and safety more than funding tax free shelters for bond funds and big banks, then vote NO on Measure J.

If you value school maintenance more than make principal and interest payments for 25-30 years, vote NO on Measure J.

Remember, financing school projects via bonds, routinely doubles the cost of the project.

For more information: www.SVTaxpayers.org

/s/ Salvador Ramirez, Small Business Owner

s/ Alfonso Hipona, Daly City Resident 53 Years 

Replies to Arguments AGAINST

PROTECT OUR STUDENTS' SAFETY. SAVE TAXPAYER DOLLARS

The argument filed against Jefferson Union High School District's Measure J is simplistic, misleading, and shortsighted. Maybe that's because the organization that took it upon itself to tell us how to manage OUR local high schools isn't even located in our district or, for that matter, in San Mateo County!

The facts:

Ensuring our children's safety is job #1

There can be no compromise on student safety. We must provide our children with secure campuses and safe classrooms.

Our schools need to be repaired.

From outdated plumbing to modernizing aging classrooms, Measure J will repair schools throughout the District.

Measure J is fiscally prudent.

The District's Board of Trustees has developed a financial stragegy that replaces previously approved bonds with new bonds, without increasing the amount of debt and saving millions in interest.

Strict taxpayer safeguards and citizen oversight begin immediately.

Every Measure J project will be thoroughly analyzed by the district's Board of Trustees and professional auditors. An independent committee of local citizens is already in place with the legally mandated responsibility to review the spending of each and every Measure J dollar.

If our students are to excel, they must have access to safe schools that meet today's educational standards. Measure J accomplishes these goals and protects taxpayers.

Vote YES on Measure J!

/s/ Andrew Lie, JUHSD Board President

/s/ Mike O'Neill, Former Pacifica Mayor

/s/ Thomas Nuris, Retired JUHSD Board Member

/s/ Mary Bier, Pacifica Councilmember

/s/ David V. Tejada, 50+ Year Daly City Resident 

Use tabs to select your choice. Use return to create a choice. You can access your choices by navigating to 'My Choices'.

Please share this site to help others research their voting choices.

PUBLISHING:PRODUCTION SERVER:PRODUCTION