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League of Women Voters of California Education Fund
November 6, 2018 — California General Election
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School

Encinitas Union School DistrictCandidate for Board Member

Photo of Amy C. Glancy

Amy C. Glancy

Parent/Educator
10,577 votes (26.3%)
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My Top 3 Priorities

  • Transparency & Accountability Too often transparency and accountability are seen as an exercise in criticism and compliance rather than an opportunity to engage communities, learn, and progress. When the public (parents, school employees, community m
  • Equity- I want to ensure that schools are meeting the needs of all students. When the Board is largely making its decisions concerning taxpayer dollars, and the constituents of the district have concerns, the Board must implement mechanisms to addre
  • Engagement- As a Board member, I intend to actively engage both district employees and the public in the decision-making process, add to the district's momentum, and look for ways to continuously improve how best to serve our students. I understand

Experience

Experience

Profession:Educator and Parent
Substitute Teacher, North County Coastal Substitute Consortium (2013–2018)

Education

California State University, San Marcos M.A., Education, Educational Administration (2018)
SDSU Multiple Subject Credential, K-8 Education (1994)
SDSU B.A., Liberal Studies, French Minor (1993)

Community Activities

School Site Council Parent Representative, Capri Elementary, EUSD (2010–2012)

Biography

Amy Glancy is a Southern California native and has lived in Encinitas for the past 16 years.  She and her husband, Ryan, have three children who all attended our local public schools.  She has been actively involved at their schools volunteering in classrooms, participating in the PTA, and serving on the School Site Council.

She attended San Diego State University, earning both her B.A. in Liberal Arts and K-8 teaching credential.  Recently she earned a Master’s degree in Educational Administration from California State University San Marcos.  Amy began her career in education in 1995 working in San Diego Unified School District as both a classroom teacher and a literacy staff developer, helping to improve the instruction of literacy in Kindergarten through 6th grade classrooms.

In order to spend more time with her growing family, she stepped away from teaching full time. As her kids gained independence and entered the Encinitas school district, Amy began working as a volunteer.  Spending time in the schools reignited her passion for education and she began working as a literacy consultant, a reading intervention teacher and as a substitute teacher within Encinitas schools. 

As a consultant, Amy took opportunities to work throughout the state from San Diego to Sacramento helping teachers and administrators develop a stronger understanding of literacy instruction and collaborating to create effective classroom practices.

Although her own children are no longer in the district, moving on to our local middle and high schools, Amy has recognized that elementary education is still where her passion lies and where she wants to focus her attention. And what better place to do it, than right here in her own community.

Questions & Answers

Questions from The League of Women Voters North County San Diego (4)

What are the pressing problems of this school district, in your opinion, and what experience do you bring to the Board that will help address these problems?
Answer from Amy C. Glancy:

One of the problems of this district is that there is a disconnect between what the district says and what the district does.  The district says it prioritizes academic excellence, yet it doesn’t appear that they are supporting the essential curriculum areas.  For example, the district does not have a vetted math curriculum and has not for several years.  While the teachers have a myriad of digital resources from which to pull from, the onus is on them to determine what to use and in what order.  This creates a tremendous amount of inconsistency.  Looking at the English Language Learners in the district, 91% are performing below state standards.  What I would bring to the board is an ability to look through the data to see where the gaps are. I will be a voice for the underserved populations in the district.  I will push for curriculum so that our teachers can teach math, instead of relying on an iPad to do the instructing.

What is your view of charter schools?
Answer from Amy C. Glancy:

My greatest wish is that charter schools were unnecessary.    Until our neighborhood schools are able to meet the needs of all of their students, it is nice to know that families have options to make the best choice for their children. Very often, charter schools are a wonderful alternative for families, but at the same time, they do siphon funding away from the district schools.  I think we should focus on improving our local schools and eliminating the need for charters.

Should the district curb its school choice initiatives (for students who are not in charter schools), so that more students stay in their neighborhood schools? Why or why not?
Answer from Amy C. Glancy:

The district currently prides itself on individual school branding- for STEM you can go to OPE, for International Baccalaureate you have Ocean Knoll, Art at Parkdale Lane and so on.  If you look at the district on paper, it appears to have a lot of innovative learning opportunities for students.  But if you really look at what is going on in the individual schools, it falls short. There are many inconsistencies between what programs are offered at each neighborhood school. Allowing inter-district transfers and giving parent options is a good thing.  A better thing would be to have consistent innovative learning opportunities at each school.

Are there school discipline strategies or behavioral support programs that you find appealing alternatives to exclusionary or punitive discipline? If so, which ones, and why?
Answer from Amy C. Glancy:

One approach to addressing problematic behavior is called restorative justice.  It focuses on building relationships and repairing harm, rather than simply punishing students for misbehavior.  If it is done correctly, schools will look at preventing discipline problems as much, if not more than, how to address them when they occur.  It is not a program, but a strategy which continually works on building and maintaining relationships between students as well as between teachers and students.  Implementing restorative practices, in a holistic way, could go a long way to preventing problems before they escalate. The discipline which follows would be more appropriate for righting the wrongs.

Political Beliefs

Political Philosophy

School Board positions for Encinitas Union School District are non-partisan.  I firmly believe that should remain that way.  I did not seek endorsements from any political parties because of that specific reason. The focus of school boards should always be on providing quality public education to the kids in your neighborhoods in a nonpartisan manner that best meets the needs of students and district residents. Partisanship does not inspire innovation, trust or efficiency.

We need to keep focused on our goals: What helps children learn? Not, how would “my party” have me vote? An updated curriculum, teacher preparation, healthy and safe school environments and equity of opportunity for all children are not partisan issues. 

Position Papers

Transparency & Accountability

Summary

The district needs more transparency and accountability. 

Too often transparency and accountability are seen as an exercise in criticism and compliance rather than an opportunity to engage communities, learn, and progress. When the public (parents, school employees, community members and students) is informed of the district’s progress and challenges, it allows them to be part of the conversation and increases the likelihood of engagement leading toward success.  Analysis and insight of school data is needed to improve upon the work the district has started and help provide accountability. Measuring and evaluating our programs and policies on an ongoing basis can ensure that we work effectively toward our goals and objectives.

Equity

Summary

Who is looking out for our underserved populations?

 

I want to ensure that schools are meeting the needs of all students.  When the Board is largely making its decisions concerning taxpayer dollars, and the constituents of the district have concerns, the Board must implement mechanisms to address those concerns. Openness of Board discussions regarding their decisions is imperative.  It is time to have an open and honest discussion around how well we are addressing student needs, including English Learners, Special Education and gifted students.  I look at this not as a criticism but as an opportunity for transformational educational growth. I look forward to promoting positive change and building solutions for our district.

Engagement

Summary

Is your voice being heard? 

 

As a Board member, I intend to actively engage both district employees and the public in the decision-making process, add to the district's momentum, and look for ways to continuously improve how best to serve our students.  I understand that my job will be to represent the community and taxpayers to ensure the most efficient, responsible use of finances and resources. Our local schools should be a collective venture, and a communitywide priority.

 

School boards provide an accessible way for parents, taxpayers, and citizens to make their voices heard in education policy. There is more to a board’s role in fiscal management than oversight responsibilities. It is up to a board to set priorities that are reflected in the school district budget. How a school district allocates resources might be the best way to tell what their priorities are. These decisions matter, and they have the potential of influencing an entire generation.

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