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June 5, 2018 — California Primary Election
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Bay Area Traffic Relief Plan

County
June 5, 2018California Primary Election

County of Alameda, Contra Costa, Marin, Napa, San Francisco, San Mateo, Santa Clara, Sonoma and Solano
Measure 3 - Majority Approval Required

To learn more about measures, follow the links for each tab in this section. For most screenreaders, you can hit Return or Enter to enter a tab and read the content within.

Election Results

Passed

442,404 votes yes (61.2%)

279,954 votes no (38.8%)

  • 100% of precincts reporting (1,305/1,305).
  • 418,572 ballots counted.

Shall voters authorize a plan to reduce auto and truck traffic, relieve crowding on BART, unclog freeway bottlenecks, and improve bus, ferry, BART and commuter rail service as specified in the plan in this voter pamphlet, with a $1 toll increase effective in 2019, a $1 increase in 2022, and a $1 increase in 2025, on all Bay Area toll bridges except the Golden Gate Bridge, with independent oversight of all funds?

Information provided by League of Women Voters of the Bay Area

The Question

Shall voters authorize a plan to reduce auto and truck traffic, relieve crowding on BART, unclog freeway bottlenecks, and improve bus, ferry, BART and commuter rail service as specified in the plan in this ballot measure, with a $1 toll increase effective in 2019, a $1 increase in 2022, and a $1 increase in 2025, on all Bay Area toll bridges except the Golden Gate Bridge, with independent oversight of all funds?

The Situation

 

The San Francisco Bay Area’s growing economy and population place a large burden on the aging transportation infrastructure. Population and jobs are forecast to continue to grow in the next 20 years along with traffic congestion. This ballot measure intends to improve the quality of life and sustain the economy of the region by improving mobility and enhancing travel options on the bay bridges and corridors by increasing the toll rate on the seven state-owned bridges. 

 

The Proposal

Approval of this measure will allow the Bay Area Toll Authority (BATA) to raise the rates by a maximum of $3 over 6 years on the rate charged by the state- owned toll bridges in the area to be used for specific projects and programs.

Fiscal effect

The Regional Measure 3 Expenditure Plan identifies projects that would be funded if voters approve a toll increase of $3 over 6 years. Funds from this increase would be used to finance a $4.5 billion slate of highway and transit projects, and would provide $60 million each year to operate new bus and ferry services in congested bridge corridors and improve regional connectivity at the soon-to-open Transbay Transit Center in downtown San Francisco. The Expenditure Plan matches investment in each county to the anticipated toll burden on its residents.

Supporters say

• Reduces truck traffic congestion and improves air quality

• Extends BART to San Jose and Silicon Valley

• Improves Transbay bus service and carpool access to improve times across bridges

• Provides funding to plan and design a second Transbay rail crossing to provide additional rail service and expand BART capacity by 45%

• Upgrades the Clipper transit card system to support universal, seamless public transit fare payment

• Improves bike/pedestrian access to train stations and ferry terminals

• Provides 50% discount on toll increase amount for commuters who cross a second bridge

• Ensures strong taxpayer safeguards, including independent audits, citizen oversight and a BART Transportation Inspector General to hold elected leaders accountable for spending

Opponents say

• Encourages single-occupant drivers to use the road by converting HOV lanes to

variable toll “Hot Lanes”
• Raises bridge tolls, thus discriminating

against low-income drivers who cannot

afford to live closer to their workplace • No guarantee against diversion of

voter-approved funds by the Bay Area Toll

Authority from their specified use
• No guarantee that funds allocated to

later projects would still be there when

needed
• No clear procedural documents which

detail how funds will be received and

administered
• No clear policy detailed about how

priorities would be chosen for the disbursement and reprogramming of funds for either surpluses or cost overruns

• No clear policy or guidelines on how to measure success

• Oversight committee does not review
both financial and programmatic information, nor provide for transparency to report to the public on their findings

Summary

Between now and 2040, the Bay Area’s economy is expected to add one million jobs, while our population is expected to grow by two million residents. To improve the quality of life and sustain the economy, Regional Measure 3 (RM 3) invests in projects that will reduce congestion and enhance travel options in the Bay Area’s seven state-owned bridge corridors as provided in Sections 1 and 7 of Senate Bill 595 (Beall, 2017). If approved by a majority of all voters in Alameda , Contra Costa, Marin, Napa, San Mateo, Santa Clara, Solano, and Sonoma counties and the City and County of San Francisco, RM3 will implement the Bay Area Traffic Relief Plan (the Plan), a set of 35 projects and programs to reduce auto and truck traffic; relieve crowding on BART; unclog freeway bottlenecks; improve bus, ferry, BART and commuter rail service; and enhance bicycle and pedestrian mobility in the bridge corridors.    

Impartial analysis / Proposal

 

Regional Measure 3 (RM3) would increase the tolls on all Bay Area toll bridges except the Golden Gate Bridge. The tolls would increase by $1 in 2019, an additional $1 in 2022, and an additional $1 in 2025, for a total increase of $3. After 2025, tolls could be increased for inflation.

 

By law, the Bay Area Toll Authority (Authority) would be required to use 16% of the funds from these toll increases to pay for up to $60 million in designated annual transportation operating programs. The Authority would be required to use the remaining available funds, which the Authority estimates will total $4.45 billion, for designated transportation capital projects throughout the Bay Area. The largest projects include:

 

·     purchasing new BART cars;

·     extending BART from the planned Berryessa/North San José Station to San José and Santa Clara;

·     widening U.S. 101 through the Marin-Sonoma Narrows to accommodate new carpool vehicle lanes;

·     improving State Route 37, which serves Solano, Marin, Napa, and Sonoma counties;

·     expanding the ferry service and  increasing  its frequency ;

  • improving Interstate 680/State Route 4 and Interstate 80/680/State Route 12 interchanges; 
  • extending Caltrain to downtown San Francisco    

 

The Authority would be allowed to provide discounts to high-occupancy vehicles or vehicles that pay tolls without using cash.  The Authority would be required to provide a discount for certain commuters who cross two bridges.

 

RM3 will be on the ballot in all nine Bay Area counties, including the City and County of San Francisco and the counties of Alameda, Contra Costa, Marin, Napa, San Mateo, Santa Clara, Solano, and Sonoma.  To pass, RM3 requires approval by a majority of votes cast on the measure in all nine counties combined.

 

An independent oversight committee would monitor how funds from the toll increases are spent. This committee and the Authority would be required to submit annual reports on use of the funds to the State Legislature.

 

A “yes” vote is a vote to increase the toll on all Bay Area toll bridges except the Golden Gate Bridge by $1 in 2019, an additional $1 in 2022, and an additional $1 in 2025.

 

A “no” vote is a vote to not approve the proposed toll increase.  

 

DONNA R. ZIEGLER County Counsel

 

The above statement is an impartial analysis of Measure RM3, which measure is printed in full in this sample ballot pamphlet. If you desire an additional copy of the measure, please call the Elections Official's office at (510) 272- 6933, and a copy will be mailed at no cost to you. You may also access the full text of the measure on the Alameda County website at the following address: www.acgov.org/rov .  http://www.acgov.org/rov/  

   

— Donna Ziegler, Alameda County Counsel

YES vote means

A “yes” vote is a vote to increase the toll on all Bay Area toll bridges except the Golden Gate Bridge by $1 in 2019, an additional $1 in 2022, and an additional $1 in 2025    

NO vote means

A “no” vote is a vote to not approve the proposed toll increase.    

Arguments FOR

Vote YES on Regional Measure 3 to relieve traffic and purchase over 300 new BART cars to run more frequent trains and reduce crowding in Alameda County.

 

Our region is suffering from the worst traffic crisis in its history and, as the Bay Area grows by 2,000,000 additional residents in the next two decades, congestion will get even worse. Too many Alameda County drivers already spend hours and hours commuting every week – keeping them away from their families and homes.

 

We need a comprehensive, long-term solution to reduce traffic, improve travel times and bring our public transportation into the 21st century. We need Regional Measure 3.

 

Vote YES on Regional Measure 3 to purchase AC Transit buses and expand express bus service in the Bay Bridge corridor to reduce travel times and increase service frequency throughout Alameda County. Regional Measure 3 will also enhance Amtrak Capitol Corridor service, build new ferry terminals in Alameda County, upgrade ferry facilities and buy more boats.

 

Even for those who don’t use public transportation, Regional Measure 3 improvements will take cars off the road and make everyone’s commutes easier.

 

Regional Measure 3 will improve safety and reduce congestion at the Interstate 680/State Route 84 interchange and improve travel times in the Dumbarton Bridge corridor.

 

Vote YES on Regional Measure 3:

·      Reduce truck traffic congestion and improve air quality

·      Extend BART to San Jose and Silicon Valley

·      Improve transbay bus service and carpool access to improve commute times across bridges 

·      Plan and design a second transbay rail crossing to provide additional capacity for BART and other rail service 

·      Upgrade the Clipper transit card system to support universal, seamless public transit fare payment

·      Improve bike/pedestrian access to train stations and ferry terminals

 

Regional Measure 3 mandates strong taxpayer safeguards, including independent audits, citizen oversight and a Transportation Inspector General to hold elected leaders accountable for spending.

 

Join commuters, traffic engineers and community leaders – vote YES on Regional Measure 3.

s/ Nancy Skinner, State Senator

s/ Libby Schaaf, Mayor of Oakland

s/ Richard Valle, Alameda County Supervisor, District 2

Jeff DelBono, President, Alameda Firefighters Association

Gary Hsueh, Senior Transportation Planner

Arguments AGAINST

Imagine you’re one of the hundreds of thousands of who commute over bridges to go to work. You leave home at dawn to join the sea of traffic crawling to work, five days/week.

 

Regional Measure 3 would raise bridge tolls $3.00 each. Now add an “adjustment for inflation,” whatever and whenever the transit agency decides. Just to get to work. This is in addition to the 2017 gas and car registration increases.

 

But the $4.5 billion in toll hikes will go to projects to improve your commute, right? A plan to “reduce auto and truck traffic?” “Traffic relief?” Don’t believe it. If you’re one of those thousands of commuters who needs your car to shop for groceries at lunchtime, and pick up children from day care, you can’t switch to the ferry even if it’s upgraded. Public transit doesn’t work for everyone. It just does not go where people need to go.

 

And will upgrading public transit reduce truck traffic? Will stores start shipping their goods by bus? By bicycle?  How gullible are we?

 

As experience teaches, many projects wont’ get built due to cost overruns. Remember the Bay Bridge? It was delivered ten years late and $5 billion over budget, already rusting, by the same agency now proposing Measure 3, the Metropolitan Transportation Commission (MTC).

 

Less than 1/5 of Measure 3 funds will go to bridge-related projects. The agency promoting toll hikes is the same agency that used current toll funds to buy itself new $250 million offices - not conveniently accessible by public transit! Don’t trust them with more money.

 

Don’t pile heavier burdens on commuters already struggling to pay their bills.

 

Vote NO on Regional Measure 3.

 

www.OccupyMTC.org

www.nine-county-coalition.squarespace.com 

s/ Robert A. Tucknott, Small Business Owner

s/ Tom Rubin, Transportation Consultant

s/ Suzanne Caro, Concerned Taxpayer

s/ Jack Weir, President Contra Costa Taxpayers Association

Replies to Arguments FOR

As a traffic relief plan, Regional Measure 3 is not the answer! Supporters’ arguments are vague generalities and promises, not solutions. Examine the projects and compare them to your commute habits. Do you see your commute improving?

 

Facts

 

  • Everyday bridge toll commuters no pay $1,100/year. This will add $660/year for a total of $1,760/year, plus inflation upcharges (220 crossings per year.)
  • Can you afford a $9.00 bridge toll?
  • Despite large investments and greater population, ridership on public transportation has declined.
  • The new $1 million/year BART bureaucracy from bridge tolls won't improve traffic congestion.

 

 

The argument in favor is misleading

 

  • New busses and BART cars are nice, but the will not reduce traffic.
  • Truck traffic patterns won’t change.
  • Express lanes are toll lanes for the elite.
  • Spending $50 million to upgrade the Clipper card will not shorten anyone’s commute.
  • Further development of bike lanes is unlikely to reduce traffic.
  • Spending $50 million to study and design another transbay crossing will not move anyone.
  • Minimum wage increases will be lost with toll increases. This burdens low-income earners in the affordable East Bay whose commutes may become unaffordable.
  • The agency pushing these toll hikes was responsible for financially disastrous projects like the Bay Bridge, Transbay Terminal, and the Oakland Airport Connector. Don’t give it more money to waste!

 

 

real plan must start with interoperability of the 20+ transportations systems. The proposed “Christmas Tree” approach to pass out contracts does not serve the people.

 

Voter NO on Regional Measure 3

s/ Robert A. Tucknott, Small Business Owner

s/ Jack Weir, President, Contra Costa Taxpayers Association

 

Replies to Arguments AGAINST

If opponents of Regional Measure 3 get their way, we will do nothing to prepare for the additional 2,000,000 residents moving to the Bay Area in the next 20 years.

 

Bay Area traffic has grown 80% since 2010 and has broken congestion records for the last four years. We cannot afford to wait and watch as commutes grow longer, public transportation becomes more crowded and Bay Area traffic becomes the worst in the country.

 

This problem will NOT solve itself. Regional Measure 3 makes vital transportation improvements BEFORE traffic gets worse.

 

Vote YES on Regional Measure 3 for a comprehensive, long-term plan that coordinates highway and transit upgrades for reduced traffic and improved commutes in Alameda County.

 

In addition to enhancing public transportation for reduced crowding and higher service frequency, Regional Measure 3 adds new managed express lanes to local highways and improves Alameda County interchanges for increased travel efficiency.

 

This will effectively reduce truck traffic congestion and reduce daily travel times throughout Alameda County.

 

Vote YES on Regional Measure 3:

·      Enhance transit through improvements in the Interstate 580 and 680 corridors

·      Purchase AC Transit buses and make improvements to reduce travel times and increase service frequency throughout Alameda County

·      Improve air and water quality

·      Extend BART to San Jose and Silicon Valley, purchase new BART cars and help expand BART capacity by 45%

 

Regional Measure 3 mandates strong taxpayer safeguards to help ensure transportation projects are completed on time and on budget, and Regional Measure 3 can NEVER raise tolls beyond what voters approve. 

 

This is our chance to reduce traffic before it brings Alameda County to a standstill. Vote YES on Regional Measure 3! 

s/ Eric Swalwell, Representative, U. S. House of Representatives

s/ Daniel Robertson, President IAFF Local 55

s/ Joel Ramos, Regional Planning Director, Transform

s/ Scott Haggerty,  Alameda County Supervisor

s/ David Lewis, Executive Director, Save the Bay

Yes on Measure 3
Yes on 3
No on Measure 3
Occupy MTC!
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