Voter’s Edge California
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Voter’s Edge California
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Presentado por
MapLight
League of Women Voters of California Education Fund
November 8, 2016 — Elección General de California
Boleta y información de la votación para el state of California.
Este archivo pertenece a una elección pasada.

Distrito 24Asamblea Estatal de CaliforniaNovember 8, 2016Elección General de California

November 8, 2016Elección General de California

Asamblea Estatal de CaliforniaDistrito 24

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Resultados electorales

  • 100% de distritos activos (293/293).

Sobre este cargo

State assembly members introduce and vote on new laws, hold hearings, and draft the state budget. They are elected to two-year terms.
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¿Quién se está postulando?

For this office, only the two candidates who get the most votes in the primary election appear in the general election. This is because of California's "top two" system. In some cases, the two candidates may be from the same political party.
Candidates are sorted in order of election results.
Demócrata
Miembro del concejo, defensor de educación
92,419 votos (54.4%)Winning
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  • Mejorar la educación pública y preparar mejor a los estudiantes para las carreras en la economía del siglo XXI.
  • Reconstruir la infraestructura de California que se está derrumbando y prepararse para las necesidades futuras.
  • Continuar el liderazgo medioambiental de California y combatir los efectos del cambio climático.
Profesión:Miembro del Concejo de la Ciudad de Palo Alto y defensor de la educación
Miembro del Concejo, Concejo de la Ciudad de Palo Alto — Cargo elegido (2012actual)
Director de desarrollo, Fundación de Educación de Silicon Valley (20142015)
Del Consejo, Merino Yebri, LLP (20122014)
Comité de Vigilancia Independiente, Plan de protección por inundacione, Distrito de Suministro de Agua de Santa Clara Valley — Cargo elegido (20102013)
Comisionado, Comisión Blue Ribbon para la infraestructura de Palo Alto — Cargo designado (20102012)
Abogado, Latham & Watkins (20082011)
Escuela de Derecho de la University of Southern California Licenciatura en Derecho (Juris Doctor), Derecho (2008)
Georgetown University Licenciatura en, Ciencias Políticas (2002)
Political Partner, Truman National Security Project (2013current)
Advisory Board Member, Silicon Valley Chapter, The New Leaders Council (20102013)
President, Peninsula Democratic Coalition (20122013)

Marc Berman is a council member for the City of Palo Alto. A lawyer by training, Marc is the Development Director at the Silicon Valley Education Foundation, a non-profit focused on STEM education and closing the achievement gap in public schools in Silicon Valley. 

Marc has been a leader on the City Council on issues such as infrastructure improvements and financial transparency. A member of Palo Alto’s Infrastructure Committee, Marc served on the campaign committee for Measure B, a ballot measure that passed with over 76% of the vote in 2014 to help fund public safety, street, sidewalk, and park improvements. This was the culmination of five years of work that Marc spent on infrastructure improvements, beginning with his appointment to Palo Alto’s Infrastructure Blue Ribbon Commission (IBRC) in 2010.

As chair of the Finance Committee, Marc worked with the Office of Management and Budget to create the Budget in Brief. Rather than expect residents to sort through 800+ pages of budget documents, the Budget in Brief provides the public with an easy to understand 7-page overview of Palo Alto’s $470 million budget, increasing transparency and public awareness of how their money is spent. 

Driven by his passion for service and for the area where he grew up, Marc has become a leader in numerous regional civic organizations, including serving as president of the Peninsula Democratic Coalition. Marc is also a founding member of the Advisory Board of New Leaders Council – Silicon Valley, a non-partisan, non-profit organization that trains civic-minded young professionals in how to create positive change in our community. In 2010, wanting to give back to the schools he attended, Marc volunteered on the Measure A campaign committee to raise funds to provide additional resources and opportunities to students in Palo Alto's public schools.

Marc began his public service in Palo Alto, working in Congresswoman Anna Eshoo’s District Office after his freshman year in college. Marc got his first taste of campaigning the following summer when, as an intern for Congressman Mike Honda’s campaign, he often spoke to students at local high schools about the benefits of community involvement and encouraged the students to get involved themselves.

Marc graduated from Georgetown University with a degree in Political Science. While in college, Marc served as a summer analyst in the Voting Section of the Civil Rights Division of the Justice Department. Marc went on to graduate from law school at the University of Southern California, where he was elected president of the Student Bar Association and served for two years on the Southern California Law Review.

Prior to his work in the non-profit sector, Marc was an attorney with Latham & Watkins LLP and Merino Yebri, LLP. Marc has successfully represented pro bono clients seeking protection under the Violence Against Women Act, asylum in the United States due to political persecution in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, and has served as pro bono counsel to Spark, a national youth development non-profit.

  • The Mercury News, Daily Post, and San Mateo Daily Journal
  • Incumbent Assemblyman Rich Gordon
  • Lt. Governor Gavin Newsom
  • Mountain View Councilmember Chris Clark
  • Secretary of State Alex Padilla
  • State Treasurer John Chiang
  • Assembly Speaker pro Tem Kevin Mullin
  • Assemblyman Evan Low
  • Assembly Majority Leader Ian Calderon
  • San Mateo County Supervisor Carole Groom
  • San Mateo County Supervisor Warren Slocum
  • Santa Clara County Supervisor Ken Yeager
  • Santa Clara County DA Jeff Rosen
  • Santa Clara County Sheriff Laurie Smith
  • San Mateo County Supervisor Rose Jacobs Gibson (former)
  • San Mateo County Supervisor Dave Pine
  • San Mateo County Supervisor Adrienne Tissier
  • San Mateo County Supervisor and former Sheriff Don Horsley
  • Menlo Park Councilmember and former Mayor Peter Ohtaki
  • Mountain View Councilmember and former Mayor Mike Kasperzak
  • Mountain View Vice Mayor Ken Rosenberg
  • Santa Clara County Assessor Larry Stone
  • Assemblyman David Chiu
  • Palo Alto Councilmember Greg Scharff
  • Palo Alto Councilmember Greg Schmid
  • Palo Alto Councilmember Cory Wolbach
  • Sunnyvale Mayor Glenn Hendricks
  • State Controller Steve Westly (former)
  • Sunnyvale Vice Mayor Gustav Larsson
  • East Palo Alto Mayor Donna Rutherford
  • Menlo Park Councilmember and former mayor Ray Mueller
  • Assemblyman Phil Ting
  • Los Altos Mayor Jim Thurber
  • Los Altos Mayor David Casas (former)
  • California Professional Firefighters
  • Equality California
  • Association of California School Administrators
  • Palo Alto and San Mateo County Firefighters
  • AFSCME California
  • Peace Officers Research Association of California
  • Cal FIRE Local 2881
  • TechNet
  • California Young Democrats
  • Silicon Valley Young Democrats
  • Peninsula Young Democrats
  • Peninsula Stonewall Democrats
  • Foothill-De Anza Faculty Association
  • Palo Alto Police Officers Association
  • California Legislative Jewish Caucus
1.
Drought

Climate changes and the continuing drought worry many in California. What new strategies do you believe would ensure that California is able to both satisfy its water needs and protect the environment? Please be specific. 

Respuesta de Marc Berman:

At the local level, I have been working to help prevent flood damage and advocating for environmentally conscious solutions to the state’s water shortage, including:

  • Serving on the Citizen Oversight Committee for the Clean Safe Creeks and Natural Flood Protection Plan of the Santa Clara Valley Water District.
  • Supporting the coequal goals for the Delta of ecosystem restoration and water supply reliability, as required by state law. He opposes the Governor’s Delta water tunnel plan because it does not meet both of these goals.

Due to climate change, we must plan for a future with more severe droughts and less water. I will advocate for a comprehensive approach that includes:

  • Developing and implementing cheaper, quicker, and more efficient ways to conserve water while simultaneously offering long-term solutions to Southern California cities and Central Valley farmers. I will promote efforts to capture and recycle more water, invest in wastewater recycling plants, rainwater collection systems, and greywater systems, and incentivize residents to switch from water thirsty lawns to water-efficient landscape design.
  • Establish plans to incentivize farmers to invest in drip irrigation systems that will conserve significant amounts of water, creating a more sustainable system for the future. 80% of our water is used for agricultural purposes, and far too many California farmers still use flood irrigation to produce their crops.
  • Protecting against sea level rise by fully funding the $1.5 billion it will cost to restore 54,000 acres of wetlands around the bay. Sea level rise threatens to contaminate up to 38% of California’s drinking water supply, destroy billions of dollars worth of homes, roads, and critical infrastructure, and disrupt communities across the Bay Area. Restoring our wetlands is the best prevention measure we have - but we must act now.
  • Leading the way on sustainability. California companies are pioneering software and devices that can drastically reduce the water we consume, including behavioral software to educate utility customers about their water use and suggest easy ways to cut back, sensors to prevent unnecessary landscape watering, and greywater systems to reuse household wastewater for nonpotable uses. These technologies should be deployed statewide with incentives for municipal and consumer adoption.
  • Modernizing and strengthening the levees in the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta that safeguard the freshwater supply for 25 million Californians. The current levee system is vulnerable to earthquakes and other natural disasters that could trigger breaches and long-term shortages of freshwater for much of the state.

 

2.
Fiscal Priorities

What are your top three fiscal priorities, recognizing the need to balance the state’s income with its spending?

Respuesta de Marc Berman:

My priorities as a state legislator will be to secure and maintain adequate and additional funding for public education in California so that we can close the achievement gap in our schools; rebuild California by repairing our crumbling infrastructure; and leverage technology and innovation to combat climate change and reduce our carbon emissions while creating good, living wage jobs here in California.

3.
High Cost of Living

If elected, what solutions do you propose to deal with the high cost of living in the Bay Area?

Respuesta de Marc Berman:

The 24th Assembly District is a wonderful place to live. Our economy is strong, many communities have high-performing public schools, and our open space and coastline are breathtaking. But these positive qualities have combined to create a housing and affordability crisis that we must address before it threatens to undo much of the progress we’ve made. Rents have increased 43-63% across the district over the past five years. 

I have helped to tackle this challenge head-on in Palo Alto, including:

  • Leading the effort on the City Council to put a plan in place to raise the minimum wage to $15 an hour by 2018.
  • Opposing the city’s vehicle habitation ban so people with nowhere else to go could sleep in their cars rather than on the streets. The ban was eventually overturned.
  • In order to foster a community discussion on the housing crisis, I helped create a group of Palo Alto residents focused on finding solutions to the housing crisis.
  • Protecting Palo Alto’s small businesses by prioritizing ground floor retail in the city’s commercial corridors. 

Solving this afoordability crisis means taking a balanced approach that prioritizes affordable housing, transit-oriented development, investing in public transportation, and better pay and benefits for workers, including:

  • Increasing the state affordable housing tax credit. Last year the legislature passed two bills with overwhelming bipartisan support, Assembly Bill 35 and Senate Bill 377, that would have increased the affordable housing tax credit by $500 million, leveraged an additional $1 billion in federal funds, and increased the value of the state affordable housing tax credit by 40%. Unfortunately, Governor Brown vetoed the legislation. California must increase the amount of affordable housing tax credits to a level capable of sustaining necessary development.
  • Passing an affordable housing bond. In 2014, Californians approved Proposition 41 to provide $600 million in funding for affordable housing for veterans, and last year San Francisco passed a $310 million affordable housing bond. We need to broaden that approach to provide funding and financing for affordable housing projects across the state. We should pass a statewide affordable housing bond measure, and we should be meeting current and future affordable housing needs.
  • Improving access to child care. The skyrocketing cost of housing is exacerbated for working families by the expense and lack of access to high quality child care services. Without subsidies, child care is only affordable for 20% of California families, and current subsidies often aren’t enough to make up the difference. We can close the gap through tax credits for employer-funded child care, expanded subsidies, and finally offering universal preschool. High quality child care should be accessible and affordable for every child in California.

 

4.
Minimum Wage

There are a variety of proposals to raise California's minimum wage. Many of these proposals face opposition from business groups who are concerned that they would kill jobs. Do you support increasing the minimum wage in California?  In your answer please explain your position on the relationship between wages and jobs with specific reference to the situation in your district. 

Respuesta de Marc Berman:

I have led the effort on the Palo Alto City Council to put a plan in place to raise the minimum wage to $15 an hour by 2018, and I support the plan passed by the legislature and signed by Governor Brown to raise the statewide minimum wage to $15 an hour by 2022. The 24th Assembly District is in the midst of an affordability crisis, and raising the minimum wage begins to address the difficulting many working families are having affording the high cost of living in our area. I am mindful of the impact raising the minimum wage may have on employers, but keeping the minimum wage far below the cost of living, which leads to greater demand on social services, is a subsidy the state can't afford and shouldn't have to pay.

5.
Money in Politics

Many Californians are concerned about the influence of money in politics. What can the state legislature do to ensure that decision-making by elected officials is not swayed by moneyed interests at the expense of constituents?

Respuesta de Marc Berman:

I fully support the DISCLOSE Act of 2015 and efforts to overturn Citizens United. We should do all we can to increase transparency, and reduce the influence of money in politics and the need for candidates to raise large amounts of money. I would like to see us move toward a system of publicly financing campaigns if we can identify adequate funding.

The legislature should also continually look for ways to strengthen ethics laws. I was disappointed that Governor Brown vetoed legislation authored by incumbent 24th District Assemblymember Rich Gordon to extend lobbying disclosure rules to lobbying done for state procurement contracts. 

6.
Traffic Congestion

What steps are needed to improve region-wide transportation planning and the growing traffic congestion?

Respuesta de Marc Berman:

Silicon Valley’s prosperous economy is creating tens of thousands of jobs, but that growth is also creating increasing traffic congestion and strain on our public transportation networks. I have a track record of improving transportation in Palo Alto:

  • In 2010, I was appointed to Palo Alto’s Infrastructure Blue Ribbon Commission (IBRC), which developed a comprehensive plan for Palo Alto to repair its infrastructure backlog and put measures in place to ensure it doesn’t fall behind again.
  • In order to foster a community discussion on the housing and transportation crisis, I helped bring together a group of Palo Alto residents to focus on finding forward-thinking, creative solutions to these complex issues.

I will use my experiences in improving transportation infrastructure to Sacramento to improve public transit options, improve road quality and safety, and prepare our transportation system for the future, including:

  • Completing the Caltrain electrification project will almost triple current capacity, take thousands of cars off the road, and relieve current and future traffic congestion up and down the Peninsula. Working with the federal government and local agencies, California should fully fund this vital project to ensure completion by 2020.
  • Reviving the Dumbarton Rail Corridor. Due to rising housing prices, more and more workers are commuting from the East Bay to jobs on the Peninsula, but there aren’t adequate public transportation options to serve them. Commuter rail via the Dumbarton Rail Corridor would reduce congestion on local roads and bridges and connect Caltrain to public transit networks in the East Bay, including BART. Working with local government and private sector partners, the state should provide funding and logistical support to the Dumbarton Rail Corridor project.
  • Repairing our crumbling highways. A recent national study ranked California’s highways as the worst in America, with 51% rated poor. This costs California motorists $44 billion a year in extra vehicle repairs and congestion-related delays. Drivers in the Bay Area pay an extra $1,700 a year. No stretch of California state highway should be rated in poor condition.
  • Developing a statewide network of electric vehicle charging stations. Governor Brown has set a goal of 1.5 million zero-emission vehicles on the road by 2025. But while we have encouraged automakers to develop these vehicles, and consumers to purchase them, we haven’t installed a network of electric vehicle charging stations capable of reliably keeping these vehicles on the road. California must have a statewide network of charging stations capable of meeting current and future demand.
  • Incentivizing transit oriented development. Locating new housing and commercial development close to planned and existing public transportation hubs makes it easier for commuters to utilize public transportation, thereby reducing traffic congestion and air pollution. The legislature should provide financial incentives and regulatory relief to local governments to enable more transit oriented development.

 

Dinero total recaudado: $925,110

A continuación, le presentamos los mayores contribuyentes que dieron dinero para apoyar al (a los) candidato(s).

1
BERMAN, MARC
$116,600
2
California Association of Realtors
$17,000
3
Sutter Hill Ventures
$16,300
4
Northern California Carpenters Regional Council
$15,000
5
California State Council of Laborers
$12,750

Por estado:

California 95.98%
New York 0.72%
Oregon 0.62%
Connecticut 0.57%
Other 2.10%
95.98%

Por tamaño:

Contribuciones grandes (99.40%)
Contribuciones pequeñas (0.60%)
99.40%

Por tipo:

De organizaciones (39.58%)
De individuos (60.42%)
39.58%60.42%
Fuente: Análisis de datos de la Secretaría del Estado de California de MapLight.
— October 28, 2016 Marc Berman for Assembly 2016
— October 28, 2016 Marc Berman for Assembly 2016
Demócrata
Abogado de tecnología, mediador
77,362 votos (45.6%)
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  • Invertir en la educación. En Sacramento, lucharé para invertir en la educación en todos los niveles, desde la educación temprana hasta la educación superior, para preparar a los estudiantes para ser parte de la fuerza laboral de hoy.
  • Proteger nuestro medio ambiente. Lucharé por disminuir también el uso del petróleo, y las emisiones que resultan del gas de efecto invernadero, a un 50 % para el 2030.
  • Extender la oportunidad económica y la vivienda asequible. Estamos en plena crisis de vivienda que debemos abordar. Ampliar las oportunidades económicas, los sistemas de transporte y las opciones de vivienda es una necesidad urgente en nuestro distri
Profesión:Abogado de tecnología/mediador/director de organización no lucrativa
Fundador y director, Veenker Law Offices (2013actualment)
Mediador, Comisión de Comercio Internacional de EE. UU. (2013actualment)
Socio, Shearman & Sterling (20002013)
Consejo General, Futbol profesional femenino (20082010)
Socio/asociado, Fish & Neave (19882000)
Georgetown University Licenciatura en Derecho (Juris Doctor, JD), Leyes (1988)
Indiana University Licenciatura en, Ciencias Políticas (1985)
Indiana University Licenciatura en, Bioquímica (1985)
Board of Directors, Past President, Law Foundation of Silicon Valley (2003current)
Director, Executive Board Member, Silicon Valley Arbitration & Mediation Center (2014current)
Director, Great Decisions Discussions Series, Foreign Policy Association (2010current)
Walk Team Captain, Walk to End Alzheimer's (2013current)

Vicki has been working with Silicon Valley leaders for nearly 25 years to foster innovation and improve her community.

AN INNOVATIVE AND EXPERIENCED LEADER
A leading patent attorney in Palo Alto, Vicki represents many of the Valley’s top innovators in matters involving new technologies and breakthrough life science inventions. Vicki’s clients have included a Nobel laureate, Fortune 500 companies, start-ups, and a low-income custodian whom she represented pro bono in an ADA and employment case. Among other honors, California Law Business selected Vicki in 2002 as one of the state’s Top 20 Lawyers Under 40.

Vicki’s passion for providing equal opportunity for women and girls led her to help found Women’s Professional Soccer as General Counsel. Her work to give some of America’s most talented, hard-working athletes a “league of their own” provided a training ground for many members of the US women’s national team who went on to win the 2015 World Cup.

FOCUSED ON COMMUNITY
As a community leader, Vicki has served as President and more than a dozen years on the Board of the Law Foundation of Silicon Valley, which provides access to justice in underserved communities and fights poverty. The Law Foundation provides free legal services to low-income clients - such as foster youth and victims of predatory lending - through its five programs: Fair Housing, Mental Health Advocacy, Public Interest Law Firm, Legal Advocates for Children & Youth, and Health Legal Services.

As the daughter of two teachers, Vicki has a natural love of teaching and learning. That passion led her to serve as an Adjunct Professor at both UC Hastings College of the Law and Santa Clara University School of Law.

Additionally, Vicki currently serves on the Alzheimer’s Association Fund Development Committee for the Northern California and Northern Nevada chapter of the Alzheimer’s Association.

BRINGING PEOPLE TOGETHER
Both the International Trade Commission and the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of California have appointed Vicki to their mediation panels. Her work brokering compromises on complex technology issues led Vicki to be named on the inaugural list of the world’s leading technology neutrals by the Silicon Valley Arbitration and Mediation Center, which she now serves as a Director.

  • Hon. Anna Eshoo, Congresswoman
  • Sierra Club of California
  • The Almanac, Mountain View Voice & Palo Alto Weekly
  • Hon. Joseph Simitian, Santa Clara County Supervisor, State Senator (former) and State Assemblymember (former)
  • Hon. Zoe Lofgren, Congresswoman
  • Hon. Libby Schaaf, Mayor, Oakland
  • Hon. Cristina Garcia, CA State Assemblymember
  • Hon. Pat Burt, Mayor, Palo Alto
  • Hon. Rick DeGolia, City Councilmember and former Mayor, Atherton
  • Hon. Tom DuBois, City Councilmember, Palo Alto
  • Hon. Lori Liu, Mayor Pro Tem, Brisbane
  • Hon. Karen Holman, City Councilmember and former Mayor, Palo Alto
  • Hon. Kirsten Keith, City Councilmember and former Mayor, Menlo Park
  • Hon. Cindy Chavez, Santa Clara County Supervisor
  • Hon. Sally Lieber, Speaker Pro Tempore & CA State Assemblymember (former)
  • Hon. Hannah-Beth Jackson, CA State Senator
  • Hon. Deborah Ruddock, Vice Mayor, Half Moon Bay
  • Hon. Delaine Eastin, State Superintendent of Public Instruction (former)
  • Hon. Fiona Ma, Chair, CA Board of Equalization & former Speaker Pro Tempore, State Assembly
  • Hon. Heyward Robinson, City Councilmember and Mayor, Menlo Park (former)
  • Hon. Judy Moss, City Councilmember and Mayor, Mountain View (former)
  • Hon. Yoriko Kishimoto, City Councilmember and Mayor, Palo Alto (former)
  • Hon. Kelly Fergusson, City Councilmember and Mayor, Menlo Park (former)
  • Hon. Robert B. Fenwick, City Councilmember and Mayor, Los Altos Hills (former)
  • Hon. Margaret Abe-Koga, City Councilmember and Mayor, Mountain View (former)
  • Hon. Byron Sher, CA State Senator (former)
  • Hon. Pete McCloskey, Congressman (Former)
  • Hon. Catherine Carlton, City Councilmember and former Mayor, Menlo Park
  • Hon. Tara Martin-Milius, City Councilmember, Sunnyvale
  • Hon. Kansen Chu, CA State Assemblymember
  • Hon. Tony Thurmond, CA State Assemblymember
  • Hon. Loni Hancock, CA State Senator
  • Hon. Fran Pavley, CA State Senator
  • Hon. Dianne McKenna, Santa Clara County Supervisor (former)
  • Hon. Terry Godfrey, Vice President, Palo Alto Unified School District Board
  • Hon. Rose Herrera, Vice Mayor, San Jose
  • Hon. Connie Leyva, CA State Senator
  • Hon. Liz Figueroa, CA State Senator (former)
  • Hon. Joan Barram, President, Foothill-DeAnza Community College District Board
  • Hon. Jane B. Reed, City Councilmember and Mayor, Los Altos (former)
  • Hon. Enid Pearson, City Councilmember, Palo Alto (former)
  • Hon. Jose Gutierrez, Jr., Mountain View Whisman School District Board
  • Hon. Pearl Cheng, Foothill-DeAnza Community College District Board
  • Hon. Ken Dauber, Palo Alto Unified School District
  • Hon. Susie Richardson, President, Palo Alto Unified School District Board (former)
  • Hon. Ginny Lear, President, Los Altos School District Board (former)
  • Hon. William Lambert, Mountain View Whisman School District Board
  • Hon. Christopher Moylan, City Councilmember, Sunnyvale (former)
  • Hon. Julia Miller, El Camino Healthcare District Boardmember and former mayor, City of Sunnyvale
  • Hon. Camille Townsend, Palo Alto Unified School District Board
  • Hon. Roy Lave, Mayor, Los Altos (former)
  • Hon. Fiona Walter, Mountain View Los Altos High School District School Board
  • Hon. Carolyn Tucher, President, Palo Alto Unified School District Board (former)
  • Hon. Thea Shelby, San Francisco City College Board
  • Hon. Ray Mueller, City Councilmember and former Mayor, Menlo Park
  • Hon. Allan Newlands, City Councilmember and Mayor, Woodside (former)
  • Hon. King Lear, Mayor, Los Altos (former)
  • Hon. Eric Filseth, City Councilmember, Palo Alto
  • California Nurses Association
  • California League of Conservation Voters
  • Mountain View Firefighters, Local 1965
  • Foothill-De Anza Faculty Association
  • California School Employees Association
  • California Teachers Association
  • Silicon Valley Asian Pacific American Democratic Club
  • National Women's Political Caucus of California
  • Democratic Activists for Women Now
  • Coastside Democratic Club
  • Dean Democratic Club of Silicon Valley
  • Palo Alto Educators Association
  • Sunnyvale Democratic Club
  • California Environmental Justice Alliance
  • Faculty Association of California Community Colleges
  • Women's Political Committee
  • South Bay Labor Council AFL-CIO
  • San Mateo Labor Council
  • California Teamsters Public Affairs Council
  • California Labor Federation
  • Voices for Progress California
  • Democratic Legislative Women's Caucus
  • United Food and Commercial Workers Western States Council
  • United food and Commercial Workers Local 5
  • Teamsters Joint Council 7
  • International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers Local 332
  • EMILY's List
  • Anita Bhagat Manwani, Boardmember, Foothill-DeAnza Foundation
  • Mark Lemley, Director, Program in Law, Science & Technology, Stanford University
  • Katharine Ku, Director, Office of Technology Transfer, Stanford University
  • Karen Grove, Board of Directors, Planned Parenthood Mar Monte
  • Susan Frank, President & COO, The Better World Group, Inc and former President & CEO, Palo Alto Chamber of Commerce
  • Jan Fenwick, Purissima Hills Water District Board Member (former)
  • Thomas Ehrlich, Visiting Professor, Stanford Graduate School of Education & former President, Indiana University
  • Michele Dauber, Professor, Stanford University
  • Gisela Zebroski, Foothill College Commissioner
  • Jackie Wheeler, Dean Democratic Club of Silicon Valley and CA Democratic Party Delegate
  • Carol Weiss, Sunnyvale Planning Commissioner and CA Democratic Party Delegate
  • Asher Waldfogel, Palo Alto Planning and Transportation Commissioner
  • Marcene Van Dierendonck, Dean Democratic Club of Silicon Valley and CA Democratic Party Delegate
  • James VanHorne, Academic Dean and Director of the MBA Program, Stanford University (former)
  • Mohammad Torabi, Dean, School of Public Health, Indiana University
  • Nancy Smith, President, Sunnyvale Democratic Club (former) and CA Democratic Party Delegate
  • Margaret Okuzumi, Sunnyvale Bicycle and Pedestrian Advisory Commissioner and CA Democratic Party Delegate
  • Lisa Matichak, Mountain View Environmental Planning Commissioner
  • Carolyn Curtis, Founding Co-Chair, Dean Democratic Club of Silicon Valley; Founding President, Friends of Edgewood Natur
  • Margaret Capriles, Mountain View Environmental Planning Commissioner and CA Democratic Party Delegate
  • Sabrina Brennan, San Mateo County Harbor District Commissioner
  • Elaine Andersen, Boardmember, Foothill-DeAnza Foundation
  • Jim Bower, Executive Director, Law Foundation of Silicon Valley (former)
  • Dudley Andersen, Chair, Citizens' Bond Oversight Committee, Foothill-DeAnza College District
  • Stacey Ashlund, Palo Alto Parks & Recreation Commissioner (former)
  • Dave Barram, former Administrator (CEO), GSA and former Deputy Secretary (COO), U.S. Department of Commerce
  • Thida Cornes, Mountain View Parks and Recreation Commissioner
  • Dave Barram, former Administrator (CEO), GSA and former Deputy Secretary (COO), U.S. Department of Commerce
1.
Drought

Climate changes and the continuing drought worry many in California. What new strategies do you believe would ensure that California is able to both satisfy its water needs and protect the environment? Please be specific. 

Respuesta de Vicki Veenker:

Leverage technology to reduce water use.  We can develop smart water grids similar to smart energy grids.  Knowing when your yard needs water or what corner of a farm needs water and what part does not, and then watering only when and where we need it, has been shown to reduce water use by up to 80%.  We should incentivize this kind of innovation to reduce demand, both through research and development tax breaks and subsidizing adoption of this technology.

Increase water recycling.  Water recycling plants are coming online in the Bay Area.  We need to propagate these efforts statewide to provide water for non-potable, and eventually potable, use.  In the meantime, we should encourage household greywater use for landscape and similar purposes.

Fix leaky infrastructure.  To ensure that we are not wasting water, outdated municipal water systems should be retrofitted to reduce and eliminate water loss.

Continue conservation efforts.  We developed some improved water use habits during our drought.  We should continue to educate our communities and our children how to respect and conserve our water supply. 

If we take these actions, we will reduce our demand on the water supply and do not need the Governor’s Delta water tunnel plan.   I oppose the $67 billion Delta tunnels which would drain more water from the Sacramento River Delta to send it down to southern California, doing unknown and likely irreversible environmental damage.  It is too expensive, too uncertain, and I believe in the ability of innovative and community-minded Californians to make it unnecessary. 

 

I stand with my endorsers in the environmental community (the Sierra Club, California League of Conservation Voters, California Environmental Justice Association, and others) in the fight against climate change, which threatens our water supply.  Sea level rise resulting from climate change can cause contamination of fresh water. I support fighting climate change by reducing green-house gas emissions through reducing fossil fuel use, a provision that was carved out of the landmark environmental legislation that passed this year.  I will work to put it back.

2.
Fiscal Priorities

What are your top three fiscal priorities, recognizing the need to balance the state’s income with its spending?

Respuesta de Vicki Veenker:

1. Increasing funding for public education from preschool to college, so that we can close the achievement gap and better prepare our workforce for today’s economy
2. Incentivize innovation to reduce water use and fight climate change, while creating jobs in the sustainable technology industry
3. Expanding housing options, including by upgrading our transportation systems

3.
High Cost of Living

If elected, what solutions do you propose to deal with the high cost of living in the Bay Area?

Respuesta de Vicki Veenker:

State Housing Bond.  The state needs to do its part to alleviate our growing housing crisis.  I support proposals for a housing bond that would provide funding for a range of affordable and middle income housing.  We need places for our workforce to live or we will soon find ourselves in communities lacking basic services.

Enforcing Housing Laws.  Housing laws must be enforced so that tenants aren’t evicted for wrongful reasons and landlords properly maintain the apartments that they lease.  We need to help tenants stay in the homes that they can afford.

 Transportation.  We need to improve public transportation options through a regional approach to allow Bay Area residents more flexibility in where they can live and still have a reasonable commute to work.  Putting new low and middle-income housing near transit corridors will also provide more affordable housing options.

4.
Minimum Wage

There are a variety of proposals to raise California's minimum wage. Many of these proposals face opposition from business groups who are concerned that they would kill jobs. Do you support increasing the minimum wage in California?  In your answer please explain your position on the relationship between wages and jobs with specific reference to the situation in your district. 

Respuesta de Vicki Veenker:

I support both the state and local efforts that resulted in raising the minimum wage to $15 in the next few years.  Because of regional differences, namely that the Bay Area cost of living is higher than that of much of the state, it is appropriate that many of the cities here will reach that level more quickly than 2022 when the state minimum wage will hit $15. 

 

The State legislature put in appropriate safeguards to protect against unwanted economic impact by giving small business an extra year in which to comply and giving the Governor the ability to suspend increases in the event of an economic downturn.

5.
Money in Politics

Many Californians are concerned about the influence of money in politics. What can the state legislature do to ensure that decision-making by elected officials is not swayed by moneyed interests at the expense of constituents?

Respuesta de Vicki Veenker:

As of this writing, there have been over $2.5 million in independent expenditures supporting my opponent’s campaign.  There have been a fraction of that, $343K, supporting mine.  This outside money distorts the messaging between candidates and voters, as well as raises the specter of undue influence. 

The legislature should pass the DISCLOSE Act which failed by a single vote this past year, and the Governor should sign it.  It will increase transparency so voters know who is behind the messaging they hear.  In addition, I support efforts to overturn Citizens United. 

 

Finally, the amount of money required for campaigning is too high.  We should pursue systems for publicly financing campaigns as the ultimate method for reducing the influence of money in politics.

6.
Traffic Congestion

What steps are needed to improve region-wide transportation planning and the growing traffic congestion?

Respuesta de Vicki Veenker:

We need an improved regional approach to our traffic and transportation problem, where all stakeholders are at the table.  Currently, the conversation does not always cross county lines and parties dealing with the north-south Caltrain corridor are not always talking to those trying to solve east-west issues such as those involving the Dumbarton Bridge. The state should facilitate a regional approach. 

We need to have improved transportation systems that both ring the bay and cross the bay.  These include:

  • Caltrain electrification
  • Completing the BART extension to San Jose
  • Improving multimodal solutions, such as bicycle and pedestrian pathways
  • Ensuring a good handshake between transportation systems, e.g. bus and rail
  • Evaluating improved solutions for crossing the bay, such as whether to revive the Dumbarton Rail project
  • Locating new affordable and middle-income housing near public transportation

 

Dinero total recaudado: $743,463

A continuación, le presentamos los mayores contribuyentes que dieron dinero para apoyar al (a los) candidato(s).

1
VEENKER, VICKI
$138,970
2
Stanford University
$26,825
3
University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA)
$16,800
4
Califonia Teachers Association
$16,700
5
Mountain View Firefighters IAFF 1965
$11,000

Por estado:

California 95.73%
District of Columbia 1.61%
Hawaii 1.14%
New York 0.80%
Other 0.72%
95.73%

Por tamaño:

Contribuciones grandes (98.96%)
Contribuciones pequeñas (1.04%)
98.96%

Por tipo:

De organizaciones (18.52%)
De individuos (81.48%)
18.52%81.48%
Fuente: Análisis de datos de la Secretaría del Estado de California de MapLight.
— May 3, 2016 Vicki Veenker for Assembly 2016

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