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Member, District 5 —San Diego County Board of EducationJune 5, 2018 —California Primary Election

School
June 5, 2018 —California Primary Election

San Diego County Board of EducationMember, District 5

Election Results

  • 100% of precincts reporting (347/347).
  • 167,427 ballots counted.

About this office

Members establish educational goals and standards, approve curricula and the district’s budget, approve various purchases and renovations, and appoint the superintendent of schools.
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Who’s Running?

You can vote for 1 candidate of 2 total candidates.
Candidates are sorted in order of election results.
Governing Board Member, San Diego County Board of Education
71,815 votes (42.9%)Winning
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  • Student Safety
  • Student Academic Achievement
  • Quality Education to the Most Vulnerable and Needy children
Profession:San Diego County Board of Education, Member
San Diego County Board of Education, San Diego County Office of Education (2015–current)
Teacher, Head Teacher, Administrator, San Diego County Office of Education (1986–2006)
Probation Officer, County of San Diego, State of California (1971–1986)
California School Boards Association Masters in Governance (2016)
United States International University M.A. (1975)
San Diego State University B.A. (1971)

Rick Shea is a trusted and proven advocate for children. He has dedicated his entire career to helping students succeed especially those most vulnerable.  He is a San Diego State University graduate and also holds a Master’s degree, five educational credentials and has completed the Masters in Governance program through the California School Boards Association. 

He has served as Head Teacher and Teacher for the San Diego County Schools. He was also an administrator for the Outdoor Science School department and Special Assistant to the County Superintendent of Schools.  Rick’s leadership extends beyond the education community.  

He has served his community as President of the Leucadia and Encinitas Town Council and as Mayor, Deputy Mayor and Councilmember for the City of Encinitas. He also served the Superior Court as a San Diego County Probation Officer.  In his first term on the San Diego Country Board of Education, he has served as Board Member, Vice President and President.  

His top priorities include a commitment to student safety, excellent student achievement and service to the most vulnerable and needy students in the county. 

He is endorsed by parents, teachers, locally elected school board presidents and members, statewide education leaders and local Mayors and Councilmembers. 

Ricks’ passion, leadership, experience, and commitment to children, qualify him to continue to serve the public on the San Diego County Board of Education

  • Tom Torlakson, California Superintendent of Public Instruction
  • Beth Hergesheimer, President, San Dieguito Union School District
  • Hon. James R. Milliken, San Diego Superior Court, Presiding Judge, Juvenile Court (ret)
  • Erica Halpern, Del Mar Union School District
  • Marla Strich, President Encinitas Union School Board
  • Kathy Rallings, Vice President Carlsbad Unified School District
  • Beth Hergesheimer, President, San Dieguito Union School District
  • Joyce Dalessandro, San Dieguito Union School District Board Member
  • Mayor Dwight Worden; City of Del Mar
  • Rick Cassar, Vice President, Mira Costa Board of Trustees
  • Amy Herman, San Dieguito Union School District Board Member
  • Mayor Catherine S. Blakespear, Mayor, City of Encinitas
  • Katie Dexter, Director, SD County and CA School Boards Ass’n and Lemon Grove School Board
  • Cipriano Vargas, Vista Unified School District Board Member
  • Julie Union, Vice President, Solana Beach School Board
  • Debra Shade, President Solana Beach School Board
  • Kristin Gibson President, Del Mar Union School District
  • Claudine Jones, Carlsbad Unified School District Board Member
  • Rimga Viscanta, Encinitas Union School Board Member
  • Tom Torlakson, California Superintendent of Pubic Instruction
  • Alicia Munoz, San Diego County Board of Education, member
  • Esther Sanchez, Council Member, City of Oceanside
  • Chuck Lowery, Deputy Mayor, City of Oceanside
  • Toni Atkins, President pro Tempore of the California Senate
  • Tamara Oderi, President of San Diego CSBA and School Board Member
  • Michael McQuary, San Diego Unified School District Board Member
  • Richard Barrera, San Diego Unified School District Board Member
  • Kevin Beiser, President San Diego Unified School District Board
  • Guadalupe Gonzalez, President, San Diego County Board of Education
  • San Diego Teachers for local Control
  • San Diego County Deputy Sheriffs Association
  • San Diego Union Tribune
  • Tammy Reina, CA Teacher of the Year and San Diego County Teacher of the Year
  • Jack O’Connell, former State Superintendent of Public Instruction
  • Melanie Tolan: 2010 California State Teacher of the Year
  • Stephan Keiley: 2011 California State Teacher of the Year
  • Sara Mathews: 2015 California State Teacher of the Year
  • Hon. James R. Milliken (ret), San Diego Superior Court Presiding Judge of the Juvenile Court
  • Hon. Pam Slater-Price, San Diego County Board of Supervisors (ret.)
  • Fahari Jeffers, San Diego County Women’s Hall of Fame
  • Carol Skiljan; CSBA Board of Directors and Encinitas Union School District Board (ret)
  • Joe Mosca, Deputy Mayor, City of Encinitas
  • Bob Nichols, President Surfing Madonna Ocean Project
  • Carolyn Cope, President Encinitas Historical Society
  • Stephanie Cruz: San Diego County Teacher of the Year finalist
  • Gregg Robinson, former San Diego County Board of Education
  • Jack Port, San Diego County Board of Education (ret)
  • Barbara Switzer Groth, Rancho Santa Fe School District Board (ret.)
1.
Question 1

Do you support by-trustee-area elections for school boards? Why or why not?

 

Answer from Rick Shea:

Yes, the more local the leader is, the more he/she should be able to represent the best interests of the community. This is the spirit of the California Voting Rights Act.

2.
Question 2

Would you vote to approve new charter petitions that are found to be legally compliant and educationally sound? Why or why not?

Answer from Rick Shea:

I put the interests of the child first. If the petition is legally compliant and not duplicative of district services and meets the needs of the child, yes. If the educational program is unsound, or there are financial irregularities, I would not approve it.

3.
Question 3

Do you believe school districts and counties should look to charter schools as a way to stimulate improvement in schools? Why or why not?

Answer from Rick Shea:

Yes, the intersts of the child should prevail. Public schools should look to successful innovative charter schools to provide innovation to their schools.

4.
Question 4

Would you support a bill requiring school districts to report how they spend funds earmarked for low-income children? Why or why not?

Answer from Rick Shea:

Yes, transparency and accountability are  essential.

5.
Question 5

Should the board limit interdistrict transfers so districts can better maintain enrollment? Why or why not?

Answer from Rick Shea:

No, the interests of the child should prevail over maintaining enrollment.

Researched by Voter’s Edge
Source: San Diego County Registrar of Voters

COUNTY OF SAN DIEGO

Board of Education – District No. 5

RICK SHEA

Governing Board Member, San Diego County Board of Education

Rick Shea, an SDSU graduate, has dedicated his educational career to helping students succeed, especially those most at-risk. Rick’s background, qualifications, and dedication to student success make him ideal to serve on the San Diego County Board of Education!

Rick served as a Classroom Teacher and Head Teacher for the Juvenile Court Schools and Special Assistant to the County Superintendent. Rick has also served as a Probation Officer, working closely with school principals to get these teenagers to complete their education.

Rick believes that students, parents, taxpayers, and the community, all benefit from every student receiving a 21st Century education, whether preparing for college or to directly enter the workforce.

Rick is committed to putting children first and keeping budget cuts and politics away from the classroom.

Rick has also served his community outside of the educational system as Mayor and City Councilmember of Encinitas, Board-member of Encinitas Fire Protection District, and North County Transit District.

Rick’s endorsements for this non-partisan office include San Diego County Board of Education members, Democrats, Republicans, Independents, Hon. James R. Milliken, Presiding Judge Juvenile Court (ret.), San Diego County Teacher of the Year and California Teacher of the Year Tammy Reina, parents, teachers, and locally elected schoolboard members.

Please Vote Rick Shea for San Diego County Board of Education!

www.re-elect-rick-shea.com

Educator/Professor/Mom
67,040 votes (40%)
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  • Safer Schools including Mental Health and Drug Prevention
  • Early Childhood Education including Socio-Emotional Learning
  • STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math) Skills for ALL Students
Profession:Educator, Professor, Administrator
Professor and Program Director - San Diego State University (2007-current), Chief of Academic Innovation e3 Civic High School 2016-Current (2016–current)
Chief of Academic Innovation, e3 Civic High, Downtown San Diego (2016–current)
Vice-Principal, Principal, Principal Coach, and Supervisor of Schools, Long Beach, Pasadena, West Contra Costa, San Diego, Compton, Lakeside, Encinitas (1995–2016)
Math Teacher, Math & Science Coordinator, and Dean of Students, Los Angeles Unified School District (1989–1995)
Software Engineer, NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory & Hughes Aircraft Company (1984–1990)
UC Santa Barbara, Cal State Dominguez Hills, USC; Badges from UCSD, University of Edinburgh, University of Michigan B.S Applied Mathematics, UCSB; MA Curriculum and Instruction, CSUDH; Ed.D. Ed Administration and Policy, USC, Badges in Learning How to Learn, Critical Thinking. Teacher Coaching, Business Entrepreneurship, and Python Coding, (2017)
University of Southern California (USC) Doctor of Education (EdD), Educational Policy, Planning and Administration (1997)
California State University, Dominguez Hills Master of Arts (M.A.), Education, Curriculum and Instruction (1993)
University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB) Bachelor of Science (B.S.), Applied Mathematics (1985)

I started out as a software quality assurance engineer for NASA Jet Propulsion Lab on the Magellan Project. After a double promotion, I moved to Hughes Aircraft, Fullerton in the hopes that a significant pay increase would quell my desire to teach, but it didn’t, so one year later I took a leave to teach and the rest is history. I was a math teacher and student dean for the Los Angeles Unified School District; a vice principal, principal and director of academic initiatives for the Long Beach Unified School District. My last principal position was here in San Diego at Capri Elementary School in Encinitas. For the last eleven years, I've been a professor at San Diego State University in the Department of Educational Leadership, and five years ago I also started our online MA in Ed Leadership program which focuses on technology (now ranked 11th in the nation by BestColleges.com). I am also the Director for this program. For the last two years, I've also been the Chief of Academic Innovation for a small STEM and design thinking high school.

  • Marshall Tuck, State Superintendent of Instruction Candidate
  • David Jones, Superintendent of Bonsall Unified School District
  • Dr. George Cameron, Superintendent of 20 Years in San Diego County (Retired)
  • Mark Wyland, California State Senator (Retired)
  • Stephen Cochrane, Ph.D., Board Trustee, Del Mar Union School District
  • Ron Roberts, ​San Diego County Board of Supervisors, Fourth District
  • Ernie Dronenburg, San Diego County Assessor/ Recorder/ County Clerk
  • Carl DeMaio, San Diego City Council Member, District 5 (former)
  • Jerome Kern, Council Member, City of Oceanside
  • Steven McDowell, Board Trustee, Del Mar Union School District (former)
  • Leslie Schneider, Board Trustee, Encinitas Union School District
  • Eleanor Evans, Board Trustee, Oceanside Unified School District
  • Maureen Muir, Board Trustee, San Dieguito Union High School District
  • John Salazar, Board Trustee, San Dieguito Union High School District
  • Dr. Randolph Ward, San Diego County Superintendent of Schools of 10 Yrs; CA-Appointed Superintendent of 10 Yrs (Retired)
  • Dr. Gloria Johnston, Ph.D. (Retired Superintendent and Resident of Poway, CA)
  • Dr. Jeffrey Felix, Superintendent of 19 years in San Diego County (Retired)
  • Dr. Chris Oram, Superintendent and Educator of Over 40 years in San Diego County (Retired)
  • Dr. Pamela Short Powell, Superintendent and Educator of Over 35 years in Public Education (Retired)
1.
Question 1

Do you support by-trustee-area elections for school boards? Why or why not?

 

Answer from Cheryl James-Ward:

Yes. Trustees elected from each of the five districts have diverse perspectives to share. Different perspectives that come from different regions of a state, county, city and even town are often unique. We want all unique experiences to be heard and valued. Having trustees elected from different areas brings the voice of all constituents to the table. The richness of the tapestry of voices provides for better informed and broad-range decisions that are in the best interest of all.

2.
Question 2

Would you vote to approve new charter petitions that are found to be legally compliant and educationally sound? Why or why not?

Answer from Cheryl James-Ward:

Yes, I believe in good schools. I support well-performing schools, be they small, large, rural, urban, suburban, public district or public charter-- schools where educators arrive every day fully prepared to make a difference on behalf of children and their families-- schools where educators understand that many students’ and families’ hopes and dreams hang on the ability to educate them well for the 21st century. I believe in good schools that understand that we must keep pace with the demands of the 21st century workforce and the global society-- schools in which educators are willing to participate in professional development and lifelong learning experiences to ensure that our children can be critical thinkers, civically engaged learners, and happy and productive citizens of the 21st century.

3.
Question 3

Do you believe school districts and counties should look to charter schools as a way to stimulate improvement in schools? Why or why not?

Answer from Cheryl James-Ward:

Charter schools were developed as experimental schools with the autonomy needed to try innovative educational models and strategies. Charter schools are held to the same standards as traditional public schools but are at risk for closure if they fail. Hence when they are successful, they represent models from which we need to better understand and potentially learn. Additionally, in a free market such as that of the United States, competition can be healthy. Without it, what incentive does an organization have to improve? Competition stimulates growth, and if the organization doesn't wish to improve, then in a competitive market it is at risk for closure. Those schools that are most successful would then be those that best meet the needs of our students. In the United States, the number of children living in poverty and homelessness is increasing. This means that families are more dependent on schools for a quality education. Schools must rise to the needs of our families. Those schools that do it well should be seen as models to study and emulate. Those that aren't successful over a given amount of time, be they public district schools or public charter schools, should be considered for closure. Having said all of this, how we measure success depends upon a number of indicators. We can look to organizations such as Ed Trust West to help us determine what these indicators are.

4.
Question 4

Would you support a bill requiring school districts to report how they spend funds earmarked for low-income children? Why or why not?

Answer from Cheryl James-Ward:

Most definitely. The Local Control Funding Formula (LCFF) and the Local Control Accountability Plan (LCAP) were both developed with the interest of the most vulnerable and sometimes voiceless students in mind. They include our foster youth; our low income youth whose parents many times are working two jobs, the working poor; and English language learners who often make up part of the working poor.  There is a base component for teacher salaries in the LCFF and a dedicated additional component of funds dedicated to children from the aforementioned groups. The ways in which we use these dedicated funds should be based upon the unique needs of the children served by each school. Examples include mental health therapists on high school campuses, additional counselors, reading specialists in elementary schools, community liaisons, computer labs and technology teachers, makerspaces, and field trips to increase exposure and experiences.

5.
Question 5

Should the board limit interdistrict transfers so districts can better maintain enrollment? Why or why not?

Answer from Cheryl James-Ward:

No, any school that is doing a great job in meeting the 21st century needs of students will eventually have a line of students wishing to enroll.  Since ultimately all districts, except basic aid districts, are funded through the same source of funding, interdistrict transfers will provide families with more public school options which I think is what we want for all of our children.  Allowing interdistrict transfers is another form of healthy competition. If kids are leaving a district or their local school, we should not punish them by cutting off or denying them access. Instead, we need to figure out how to replicate the working models that are out there and truly meeting the needs of our students. If a car company sells cars that no one wants, they don’t cut off access to other cars, they get rid of the unwanted models and figure out better ways to meet the needs of their clients. Isn’t that what it’s really about? Our students deserve the best options available to them so that they can become college and career competitive.

 

Cheryl James-Ward Focus

Summary

This paper provides a brief background of each of my four priorities. 

Priority # 1 Safe School ​In this unprecedented era of school shootings, we must rethink how we protect our children.  One solution to this conundrum is technology. The tech sector should collaborate with educators to determine innovative ways to identify guns on campus and alert school personnel. If we can get a spacecraft to Pluto and create autonomous vehicles, we can find a nonintrusive way to fortify our schools through technology.

 

With the increase of gun violence in high schools and the correlation to mental illness schools need to find comprehensive ways to support students and families that struggle with mental illness. Because adolescents are generally more stressed today than in the past, one way schools can begin to address the issue is by hiring trained mental health therapists to be present on campus, visiting classrooms, checking in with students and with the help of the entire school staff watching for signs of distress and mental issues with children. When identified, schools and districts must work with the community organizations to address the issues. This is just one part of the solution, comprehensive ongoing training for staff is also necessary (Payton, Wardlaw, Graczyk, Bloodworth, Tompsett, Weissberg, 2009).

Since 2010 and again more recently with the passage of the marijuana bill in California in 2016, schools have seen a dramatic increase in the use of marijuana by high schoolers. Yet, research is clear that marijuana negatively impacts adolescent brain development. In cases, where there are prolonged usage, the effects have been compared to that of lead. The best way to prevent children from using marijuana and other drugs  is for educators, parents and students to stay informed and for parents to stay close to their children. Contrary to what some parents are told, high school is not the time to step away from our children, but to stay actively involved. Adolescents are most vulnerable and the most preyed upon because they unwittingly believe they have figured everything out. It also at time in which they are being bombarded with social media and the stresses that come with it (WAng & Sheikh-Khalil, 2013). Marijuana diversion programs which teach kids the ill effects of drugs are another way to prevent  kids from experimenting with the drug in the first place. Payton, J., Wardlaw, D., Graczyk, P., Blookdworth, M., Tompsett, C., Weissberg, R. (Oct. 2009). Social and Emotional Learning: A Framework for Promoting Mental Health and Reducing Risk Behavior in Children and Youth. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1746-1561.2000.tb06468.x Wang & Sheikh-Khalil (Aug. 2013). Does Parental Involvement Matter for Student Achievement and Mental Health in High School. https://doi.org/10.1111/cdev.12153 Priority 2 Early Childhood Education

Every toddler should have the opportunity to attend preschool. This should not be based on parents ability to pay or zip code, but rather our will as a state to equitably educate every child. The research is clear that those who enter kindergarten without preschool experiences start at a disadvantage that in many cases continues to widen.

 

What the research says

“Humans are wired to want to understand the world around them. We come out of the box that way,” said Elizabeth Rood, co-author of the report and director of the Center for Childhood Creativity , which is based at the Bay Area Discovery Museum. “Even kids who are pre-verbal have pretty sophisticated reasoning skills. The sooner parents and teachers introduce scientific vocabulary and concepts, the more likely kids will have the tools to help them succeed in science later on.”  Science education for most children in California begins in elementary school, but it should start much sooner — in infancy, even — for children to achieve their full potential as young scientists, according to a new report by the Center for Childhood Creativity.

 

The 44-page report, “The Roots of STEM Success: Changing early learning experiences to build lifelong thinking skills,” is based on a review of 150 studies on the education, cognitive development and developmental psychology of children age 10 and under. It found that even though very young children may lack the ability to sift through information and express themselves, they can grasp complex scientific concepts, test theories and draw conclusions.  EdSource March 8, 2018

Priority 3 ​Science Technology Engineering Arts and Math for Every Student
If we want to ensure that our children have access to jobs that are in high demand, then STEM skills are a requirement and not an option. ​”The US Department of Education reports that the number of STEM/STEAM jobs in the United States will grow by 14% from 2010 to 2020, growth that the BLS terns as “much faster “ than the national average of 5-8 % across all job sectors.”  HuffPost, Importance of STEAM Learning (Dec, 6, 2017).
With this in mind, there are a few questions educators in San Diego should be asking: Are STEM skills a part of every schools curriculum? What are we doing to connect our schools with Sorrento Valley? What partnerships have we developed to ensure all students have an opportunity to work with scientist and engineers in the field today?

 

​In the technology or educational sectors, STEM is the acronym for the educational focus in science, technology, engineering and math. In the last few years, we’ve added the Arts and renamed it STEAM. This is important because not only do we want our children to have the STEM skills but also creativity skills to reimagine what exist and create a new. Adding the arts provides our children with that opportunity. James D. Basham, Maya Israel, Kathie Maynard, (2010). An Ecological Model of STEM Education: Operationalizing STEM for All. Journal of Special Education Technology, Vol 25, Issue 3, 2010

Priority 4, Providing Support and Accountability to Our Schools

​Supporting our schools and districts requires that we understand their diverse needs and that we lobby for funding and accountability for both our basic aid districts and Local Control Funded Districts. ​It also means that we use the funding provide by the state in ways in which it was intended. With the onset of the Local Control Funding formulas, county offices of education are now required to ensure that the districts in their counties are using Local Control Funding in line with the letter of the law. As such they have come under tremendous pressure by organizations with agendas wishing to test the boundaries of the law. This requires board members that are well informed and courageous.

 

 

The position paper provides research on Dr. Cheryl James-Ward's top four priorities

Summary

Safe Schools and Mental Health Research

Need for early childhood education

Need for STEM skills for every student 

LCAP and Checks and Balances

 

Priority 1 Safe Schools - ​In this unprecedented era of school shootings, we must rethink how we protect our children.  One potential solution to this conundrum is technology. The technological sector can collaborate with educators to determine innovative ways to identify guns on campus and alert school personnel. If we can get a spacecraft to Pluto and create autonomous vehicles, we can find a nonintrusive way to fortify our schools through the use of technology.

 

With the increase of gun violence in high schools and the correlation to mental illness, schools must find comprehensive ways to support students and families that struggle with mental illness. It is evident that adolescents are generally more stressed today than they have been in the past. One way schools can begin to address the issue is by hiring trained mental health therapists to be present on campus, visiting classrooms and checking in with students. With the help of the entire school staff, we can watch for signs of distress and other mental health issues. Schools and districts must work with community organizations to address these issues. This is just one part of the solution; comprehensive ongoing training for staff is also necessary (Payton, Wardlaw, Graczyk, Bloodworth, Tompsett, Weissberg, 2009).

Since 2010, and again more recently with the passage of the marijuana bill in California in 2016, schools have seen a dramatic increase in the use of marijuana by high schoolers.This is an urgent issue because research is clear that marijuana negatively impacts the development of the adolescent brain. In cases where there is prolonged use of marijuana, the effects have been compared to that of an exposure to lead. The best way to prevent children from using marijuana and other drugs  is for educators, parents and students to stay informed, and for parents to stay close to their children. Contrary to what some parents are told, high school is not the time to step away from our children but instead to stay actively involved. Adolescents are most vulnerable and the most preyed upon because they unwittingly believe they have figured everything out. This is also a time in which teens are being bombarded with social media and the stresses that come with it (Wang & Sheikh-Khalil, 2013). Marijuana prevention programs which teach kids the ill effects of drugs offer ways to prevent students from experimenting with the drugs to begin with. Diversion programs are then important to help those who are users to successfully stop.       Payton, J., Wardlaw, D., Graczyk, P., Blookdworth, M., Tompsett, C., Weissberg, R. (Oct. 2009). Social and Emotional Learning: A Framework for Promoting Mental Health and Reducing Risk Behavior in Children and Youth. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1746-1561.2000.tb06468.x Wang & Sheikh-Khalil (Aug. 2013). Does Parental Involvement Matter for Student Achievement and Mental Health in High School. https://doi.org/10.1111/cdev.12153 Priority 2 Early Childhood Education for all Preschoolers

 

Every toddler should have the opportunity to attend preschool. This should not be based on parents’ ability to pay or zip codes but rather our will and desire to equitably educate every child. The research is clear that those who enter Kindergarten without preschool experience start at a disadvantage that creates an achievement gap that continues to grow because the benefits of massive early brain development have been lost.

 

What the Research Says

“Humans are wired to want to understand the world around them. We come out of the box that way,” explains Elizabeth Rood, co-author of the report and director of the Center for Childhood Creativity, based at the Bay Area Discovery Museum. “Even kids who are preverbal have pretty sophisticated reasoning skills. The sooner parents and teachers introduce scientific vocabulary and concepts, the more likely kids will have the tools to help them succeed in science later on.”  Science education for most children in California begins in elementary school, but it should start much sooner — in infancy, even — for children to achieve their full potential as young scientists, according to a new report by the Center for Childhood Creativity.

 

The 44-page report, “The Roots of STEM Success: Changing early learning experiences to build lifelong thinking skills,” is based on a review of 150 studies on the education, cognitive development and developmental psychology of children age 10 and under. It found that even though very young children may lack the ability to sift through information and express themselves, they can grasp complex scientific concepts, test theories and draw conclusions.  

 

Hadani, H. & Rood, E. (2018). The Roots of STEM Success. Center for Childhood Creativity.

Priority 3 ​Science Technology Engineering Arts and Math (STEAM) for Every Student

If we want to ensure that our children have access to jobs that are in high demand, then STEM skills are a requirement and not an option. ​ “The US Department of Education reports that the number of STEM/STEAM jobs in the United States will grow by 14% from 2010 to 2020, growth that the BLS terns as “much faster “ than the national average of 5-8 % across all job sectors.”  (Vidcode, 2017).

With this in mind, there are a few questions educators in San Diego should be asking: Are STEM skills a part of every schools’ curriculum? What are we doing to connect our schools with Sorrento Valley? What partnerships have we developed to ensure all students have an opportunity to work with scientists and engineers?

 

​In the technology or educational sectors, STEM is the acronym for the educational focus in science, technology, engineering and math. In the last few years, we’ve added the Arts and renamed it STEAM. This is important because not only do we want our children to have STEM skills but also creativity skills to reimagine and redefine what exists and create anew. Adding the arts provides our children with that opportunity (Basham, Israel, & Maynard, 2010).

 

Basham, J., Israel, M., Maynard, K. (2010). An Ecological Model of STEM Education:       Operationalizing STEM for All. Journal of Special Education Technology, Vol 25, Issue 3, 2010

Vidcode (Dec. 6, 2017). The Importance of STEAM Learning. Huffpost.

 

 

Priority 4  Providing Support and Accountability to Our Schools

​Supporting our schools and districts requires that we understand their diverse needs and that we lobby for funding and accountability for both our basic aid districts and Local Control Funded Districts. ​It also means that we use the funding provided by the state in ways in which it was intended. With the onset of the Local Control Funding formulas, county offices of education are now required to ensure that the districts in their counties are using Local Control Funding in line with the letter of the law. As such, they have come under tremendous pressure by organizations with agendas wishing to test the boundaries of the law. This requires board members that are well informed and courageous.

 

When will women be judged on their own merit?

Summary

Dr. Cheryl James-Ward believes in empowered women of the 21st Century. From personal experience, she speaks to the issues that women continue to face today as they strive to be leaders in public and private organizations. 

When will women be judged on their own merit?

 By Cheryl James-Ward · May 28, 2018

www.cheryljamesward.com 

 

This weekend the Union Tribune reluctantly decided not to endorsement me for the County Board of Education because I did not respond to a question about the departure of my husband, former County Superintendent, Dr. Randy Ward, from the County Office of Education. In the 21st century where women are their own persons and have accomplished so much, where girls make up at least half of the students in colleges, we are still being judged by our husbands. What a huge disappointment.   

 

I should be judged on my own merit, not that of my husband.  I’m a woman in my own rite with my own experiences and successes. I am one of the first two African American women to graduate with a B.S. in Applied Mathematics from UC Santa Barbara; a former NASA Jet Propulsion Lab engineer; USC Meritorious Dissertation of the Year Awardee; a school turn around principal; a leadership coach; a tenured professor at San Diego State University (SDSU); director of the SDSU Chinese and American Leadership Symposium; director of the MA Ed Leadership Online program ranked 11th in the nation; and Chief of Academic Innovation for a small tech high school. I have shared my own experiences many times and still it comes to this. What does a woman have to do? 

 

The Union Tribune wants to know about my husband, so here it is. My husband, Dr. Randolph E. Ward, was a successful State Appointed Administrator charged with turning around two bankrupt school districts over ten years. The first he led back to solvency and increased student performance from the lowest in the state to the 33rd percentile. In both places he chose kids first by terminating workers who slept on the job, staff that embezzled funds, and teachers who chose not to come prepared to teach. He closed failing schools and created a new accountability system, one that the local control funding formula is modeled after. He was fiscally responsible which did not make many adult interest groups happy. Dr. Ward then led the San Diego County Office of Education for nine plus unblemished years when suddenly the County Board became 100% backed by the American Federation of Teachers. A few months later, Randy Ward was accused of all sorts of things, and a lawyer who has since been sanctioned by the California Courts for filing frivolous law suits was the only one that could be found to file the suit against Randy Ward. What does that tell you?

 

Randy Ward is my amazing husband, but my name is Cheryl James-Ward. It’s time to stop putting women in the shadows of men. I am a woman with my own story, my own experiences and successes ready to take San Diego County students in an incredibly new direction. With the support of voters in North County who believe in kids first and that women should be judged on their own merit, we will!

Researched by Voter’s Edge
Source: San Diego County Registrar of Voters

COUNTY OF SAN DIEGO

Board of Education – District No. 5

CHERYL JAMES-WARD AGE: 54

School Administrator/University Professor-Program Director

In a shrinking world in which technology is ubiquitous, it’s important for our children to be global citizens; strong communicators; and computer literate critical thinkers. As a professor teaching masters and doctoral students in educational leadership, the chief of academics for a high school, and mother of an 8th and 9th grader, getting education right lives at my core. As your San Diego County Board of Education representative, I will work with every district and family to prepare our children for a world with endless possibilities.

When elected, I will focus on four priorities: differentiated systems of support for our schools; early childhood education for all; STEAM skills for every student; safe schools including marijuana diversion programs.

My professional experience began as a quality assurance engineer for NASA Jet Propulsion Lab. I then worked as a software engineer for Hughes Aircraft before taking a leave to fulfill my love of teaching. My experience in education includes service as a math teacher, middle school dean, vice principal, principal, and director of academic initiatives. I am now a professor in SDSU’s Department of Educational Leadership. Thank you!

For a list of endorsements and to learn more about me visit

james-ward.wixsite.com/4countyschoolboard.

This video briefly describes Cheryl's background, why she understands education for the 21st century and the skills sets our children will need to be successful now and in the future. It's is 45 seconds in length. 

Race for District 5: Cheryl James-Ward — June 2, 2018 KUSI News San Diego

David Davis interviewed Cheryl James-Ward, who is running for the District 5 seat on the San Diego County Board of Education.

Politically Speaking: Office of Education Race — June 2, 2018 NBC 7 News San Diego

Video Note: Cheryl James-Ward has quite a background in academics - schoolteacher, principal, university leadership professor, and NASA Jet Propulsion Lab Engineer. The candidate for the county school board stops by NBC 7's Politically Speaking with Gene Cubbison. 

Email cjamesward4countyboard@gmail.com
Address:
992 Lomas Santa Fe Drive Ste C-192
Solana Beach, CA 92075

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