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June 7, 2016 — California Primary Election
Ballot and voting information for Alameda County.
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Job Training, Classroom Repair and Student Safety Measure

Special District
June 7, 2016California Primary Election

Chabot-Las Positas Community College District
Measure A - 55% Approval Required

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Election Results

Passed

87,133 votes yes (64.94%)

47,032 votes no (35.06%)

  • 100% of precincts reporting (534/534).

To upgrade aging classrooms and technology/science labs for career education to prepare students, veterans and workers for good jobs and university transfer, remove asbestos/retrofit buildings for earthquake safety, acquire, construct and repair sites/facilities/equipment, and improve campus safety/security, shall Chabot-Las Positas Community College District issue $950,000,000 in bonds at legal rates, no money for administrators' salaries/pensions, independent financial audits, and all funds used locally?

Impartial analysis / Proposal

Measure A, a Chabot-Las Positas Community College District ("District") bond measure, seeks voter approval to authorize the District to issue nine hundred fifty million dollars ($950,000,000 .00) of bonds at legal rates. The primary purpose of the bonds is to finance school facilities projects as specified in the measure.

 Pursuant to California Constitution Section 18 of Article XVI and Section 1 of Article XIIIA and California Education Code Section 15274, this measure will become effective upon the affirmative vote of at least 55% of the qualified electors voting on this measure.

 California Education Code Section 15100 restricts the use of the proceeds from the bonds sale to items such as building school buildings, improving school grounds, supplying school buildings and grounds with equipment, and the acquisition of real property for school facilities. In addition, proceeds may only be used for the projects listed in the measure. This measure provides that its proceeds will fund projects outlined  in  the measure (reproduced in the sample ballot pamphlet) that include, but are not limited to: upgrading emergency communication systems, campus lighting, signage, cameras, and door locks; upgrading electrical wiring, gas and sewer lines; and fixing and repairing roofs and bathrooms. Proceeds may not be used for any other purpose, such as administrator salaries.

 If 55% of those who vote on the measure vote "yes", the District will be authorized to issue bonds in the amount of nine hundred fifty million dollars ($950,000,000.00). Approval of this measure will authorize a levy on the assessed value of taxable property within the District by an amount needed to pay the principal and interest on these bonds in each year that the bonds are outstanding.

 The Tax Rate Statement for Measure A in this sample ballot pamphlet reflects the District's best estimates, based upon currently available data and projections, of the property tax rates required to service the bonds. The best estimate of the tax rate required to be levied to fund the bonds during the first fiscal year (2017-2018) after the first sale of the bonds, during the first fiscal year (2029-2030) after the last sale of the bonds, and at the highest tax rate is $0.02450 per $100.00 of assessed valuation, or $24.50 per $100,000.00 of the assessed valuation. The best estimate of the total debt service, including principal and interest, that would be required to be repaid if all the bonds are issued, sold, and paid would be $1,824,385,975.00.

 An independent citizens' oversight committee will monitor the bond expenditures. No district employee, official, vendor, contractor, or consultant may sit on the committee.

 If 55% of those voting on this measure do not vote for approval, the measure will fail and the District will not be authorized to issue the bonds.

 This measure is placed on the ballot by the governing board of the District.

s/DONNA R. ZIEGLER

County Counsel

 The above statement is an impartial analysis of Measure A, which is printed in full in this sample ballot pamphlet. If you desire an additional copy of the measure, please call the Elections  Official's  office  at (5I 0) 272-6933 and a copy will be mailed at no cost to you. You may also access the full text of the measure on the Alameda County website at the following address: www.acgov.org/rgy/.

— Donna R Ziegler, County Counsel

Tax rate

An election will be held in the Chabot-Las Positas Community College District (the "District") on June 7, 2016, for the purpose of submitting to the electors of the District the question of issuing General Obligation Bonds of the District in the principal amount of $950 million . If such bonds are authorized and sold, the principal thereof and interest thereon will be payable from the proceeds of taxes levied on the taxable property in the District. The following information regarding tax rates is provided to comply with Section 940I of the Elections Code of the State of California. This information is based upon the best estimates and projections presently available from official sources, upon experience within the District and other demonstrable factors.

Based upon the foregoing and projections of the assessed valuations of taxable property in the District, and assuming the entire debt service, including principal and interest on the bonds, will be paid through property taxation:

I. The best estimate from official sources of the tax rate that would be required to be levied to fund the bond issue during the first fiscal year after the first sale of the bonds and an estimate of the year in which that tax rate will apply is $0.02450 per $100, or $24.50 per $100,000, of assessed valuation of all property to be taxed in fiscal year 2017-18.

2. The best estimate from official sources of the tax rate that would be required to be levied to fund the bond issue during the first fiscal year after the last sale of the bonds and an estimate of the year in which that tax rate will apply is $0.02450 per $100, or $24.SO per $100,000, of assessed valuation of all property to be taxed in fiscal year 2029-30.

3. The best estimate from official sources of the highest tax rate that would be required to be levied to fund the bond issue and an estimate of the year in which that rate will apply is $0.024S0 per $100, or $24.50 per $100,000, of assessed valuation of all property to be taxed in fiscal year 2017-18.

4. The best estimate from official sources of the total debt service, including principal and interest, which would be required to be repaid by the tax rates levied on taxable property, if all of the bonds are issued, sold and paid as projected would be $1,824,385,975.

The attention of all voters is directed to the tact that the foregoing information is based upon projections and estimates only. The actual tax rates and the years in which they will apply may vary from those presently estimated, due to variations from these estimates in the timing of bond sales, the amount of bonds sold and market interest rates at the time of each sale, and actual assessed valuations over the term of repayment of the bonds. The date of sale and the amount of bonds sold at any given time will be determined by the District based on its need for County of Contra Costa in the annual assessment and the equalization process. Accordingly, the actual tax rates and the years in which such rates are applicable may vary from those presently estimated above. 

s/JANNETT N. JACKSON, Ph.D.

Chancellor of the Chabot-Las Positas Community College District

— Jannett N. Jackson, Ph.D., Chancellor of the Chabot-Las Positas Community College District

Arguments FOR

Join us in voting Yes on Measure A to upgrade Chabot and Las Positas Colleges and continue preparing students, veterans and workers for good paying jobs and transfer to four-year universities.

Chabot-Las Positas Community College District serves residents of Castro Valley, Dublin, Hayward, Livermore, Pleasanton, San Leandro, San Lorenzo, Sunol and Union City and provides quality higher education to local students. As the cost of attending California's public universities has risen at least six times that of a community college, local families have relied on Chabot and Las Positas Colleges to save tens of thousands of dollars.

Veterans, many of whom have returned from war zones and face challenges including posttraumatic stress disorder and permanent disability, also rely on the colleges' services and job training programs to complete their education and enter the civilian work force.

Measure A ensures our campuses remain safe places for students to learn, upgrades classrooms, facilities and technology and expands access to training programs that help students learn new skills and find better paying jobs in business, technology, nursing, early childhood education, public safety and other high-demand careers.

Every penny from Measure A will stay local to benefit Chabot and Las Positas Colleges.

Measure A will:

  • ·      Upgrade classrooms and labs for science, technology, engineering and math-related fields to better prepare students for good-paying jobs
  • ·      Retrofit buildings to improve earthquake safety Improve support programs and educational resources for veterans
  • ·      Improve and maintain classrooms and Jabs for career preparation in fields like healthcare and early childhood education
  • ·      Improve access to facilities for those with disabilities

Measure A Requires Strict Fiscal Accountability:

  • ·      Independent Citizens' Oversight Committee and annual audits are required
  • ·      Funds cannot be used on teacher and administrator salaries or benefits
  • ·      Funds cannot be taken by the State

Vote Yes on Measure A-to continue preparing students for four-year universities and future careers.

s/ERIC SWALWELL, Congressman, 15th District

s/DALE ELDRIDGE KAYE, Business Woman, CEO Innovation Tri Valley Leadership

s/RICHARD VALLE, Alameda County, Supervisor

s/FRANCES HUI, Las Positas College Librarian

s/GREGORY J. AHERN, Alameda County Sheriff

Arguments AGAINST

Bonds are expensive forms of debt. Like bank loans, bonds are repaid with interest, over time.

People pay back the principal and interest on car loans, school loans, and mortgages using their income. Public agencies don't have income; they get taxes from us.

Schools repay the bond principal and interest by making the public pay higher taxes.

Residents OPPOSE this bond because:

  • District use of RISKY BORROWING with NO INTEREST PAYMENTS  and HUGE BALLOON PAYMENTS means taxpayers pay HUNDREDS OF MILLIONS in UNNECESSARY COSTS. The District's reckless ways even made headline news!
  • The bond PROJECT LIST includes EVERYTHING AND THE KITCHEN SINK. No one knows how the bond money would be spent.
  • Many people are unemployed, underemployed, or financially stretched and CANNOT AFFORD TO PAY MORE.
  • Every year the District LIVES BEYOND ITS MEANS, spending more than it budgeted. Last year's salaries and benefits alone increased by more than 8% -- $8 MILLION MORE THAN THE PREVIOUS YEAR.
  • Various government agencies are asking for new taxes and bond debt because RISING PUBUC EMPLOYEE RETIREMENT COSTS  CROWD OUT SPENDING for everything else.
  • The District NEGLECTS REGULAR UPKEEP of its campuses. Taxpayers shouldn't have to pay for ROUTINE MAINTENANCE using BORROWED MONEY with EXPENSIVE INTEREST COSTS.
  • District construction policies reduce competition. Without vigorous competition for all work, contractors have less incentive to deliver QUALITY WORK at a REASONABLE COST.
  • This bond TAKES NEW MONEY to PAY OFF OLD DEBT. This leaves LESS MONEY FOR NEW PROJECTS.

 Residents expect and deserve to get good value for every tax dollar.

 Vote NO on Measure A!

 s/JACK WEI R, President, Contra Costa Taxpayers Association

Replies to Arguments FOR

Until the District handles its finances responsibly, taxpayers should REJECT NEW BONDS.

Residents oppose this bond because:

  • The District MISHANDLED ITS LAST BOND PROGRAM. In 2004 voters approved  $498 million in bonds. Some of these bonds were sold at excessive interest rates. As a result, borrowing$169 million cost the District $850 million with interest, or $6 for every $I borrowed.
  • The tax rate statement MISLEADS VOTERS by understating the TRUE COST, which will likely exceed $2 BILLION.
  • The District already has $730 million in long-term debt and CAN'T AFFORD ANY MORE DEBT. Interest payments TRIPLED last year, increasing from $6.5 million to $20.5 million.
  • Many people CAN'T AFFORD to INCREASE their community college tax bill .
  • The project list includes  many ITEMS THAT WILL WEAR OUT LONG BEFORE THE DEBT IS PAID. Bond debt should be used for items that will last 40+ years.

Vote NO to tell District officials you expect HONESTY about bond costs, RESPONSIBLE care of finances and schools, and SOLID VALUE for your tax dollars.

s/JACK WEIR, President,  Contra Costa Taxpayers Association    

Replies to Arguments AGAINST

The signer of the argument against Measure A lives outside of Alameda County and clearly does not understand the needs and challenges facing Chabot and Las Positas colleges. Moreover, the association affiliated with the signer frequently writes similar arguments against measures that support schools, police, firefighters and other important local services.

Alameda County residents recognize the vital role that Chabot and Las Positas colleges play in providing quality and affordable higher education to local students, veterans and workers.

The District has a proven track record of spending taxpayers' dollars carefully and responsibly, with the citizens' oversight committee reports and annual audits to prove it.

Measure A makes critical improvements and safety repairs to ensure our local community colleges continue preparing students, veterans and workers for good-paying jobs and transfer to four-year universities.

FACT-there is no other source of funding to address these problems:

  • Upgrade classrooms and labs for science, technology, engineering and math-related fields
  • Retrofit buildings to improve earthquake safety
  • Improve support programs and educational resources for veterans
  • Improve classrooms and labs for career preparation in fields like healthcare and early childhood education
  • Improve access  to facilities for those with disabilities

Measure A is the solution that provides locally controlled funding that cannot be taken by the State.

A mandatory independent citizens' oversight committee and annual audits will ensure Measure A funds are spent only on voter-approved projects.

Protecting high-quality and affordable higher education is a wise investment. Join us in voting YES on A.

s/ISOBEL F. DVORSKY, Chabot-Las Positas Trustee and San Leandro resident

s/TIM SBRANTI, Former Mayor, Dublin and Educator

s/PATRICK  M. LOFFT, Member, Measure B Citizens' Oversight Committee

s/DAVID D. FOUQUET, Chabot College Faculty & District Facilities Committee Co-Chair

s/RAJINDER S. SAMRA, Director of Research and Planning, Las Positas College

Proposed legislation

PROJECTS

 The Board of Trustees of the Chabot-Las Positas Community College District, to be responsive to the needs of its community, evaluated each of Chabot College's and Las Positas College's urgent and critical facility needs, and its capacity to provide students, active military, and Veterans with support and job training facilities, an affordable education and prepare them for success in college and careers. Job training facilities, safety issues, class size and offerings, and information and computer technology were each considered in developing the scope of projects to be funded, as such  are outlined  in  the District's 2012 Facilities Master Plan, incorporated herein by reference in its  entirety (the  "Master  Plan"), and available for review on the District's website (www.clpccd.org). In developing the scope of projects, basic repairs, job training facilities, campus safety, facilities supporting Veterans, and the expansion of oppo1tunities for local students to receive an affordable, quality education, were prioritized. If these facility needs are not addressed now, the District's Colleges would be unable to remain competitive in preparing students for jobs in high demand industries and university transfer. The Board of Trustees determines that Chabot College and Las Positas College MUST:

(i) Increase opportunities for local students to earn college credits, certifications and job skills at reasonable prices and transfer to four-year colleges and universities;

(ii) Upgrade and expand Veteran services and job training so returning Veterans receive the support they need to complete their education and enter the civilian workforce;

(iii) Expand essential job training and workforce preparation for students of all ages and local residents;

(iv) Provide local students with an affordable, low cost, high quality education;

(v) Adhere to stringent FISCAL ACCOUNTABILITY safeguards including:

(a) All expenditures will be subject to annual independent financial audits,

(b) No funds will be used for administrators' salaries and pensions,

(c) ALL FUNDS WILL BE SUBJECT TO LOCAL CONTROL,

(d) An independent citizens' oversight committee will be appointed to ensure that all funds are spent only as authorized.

The following types of projects are authorized to be undertaken at Chabot College and Las-Positas College:

 PROVIDING AN AFFORDABLE EDUCATION FOR LOCAL RESIDENTS AND VETERANS:

Basic Repair Projects Needed To Make Chabot  College and Las Positas Collee a  Safer Place to Learn

 Goals and Purposes: The cost to attend California's public universities has risen to at least six times that of attending a community college. As a result, more local students and their families rely on Chabot College and Las Positas College to save tens of thousands of dollars. Additional funds are needed to increase opportunities for local students to earn college credits, certifications, and job skills at a reasonable price and transfer to four­year colleges and universities.

 To make sure that Chabot College and Las Positas College are safe places to learn, funds will be used to upgrade campus security emergency communication systems, campus lighting, signage, cameras, and door locks, ensuring the safety and security of students.

Many of Chabot's and Las Positas' buildings, classrooms, science labs, and job training equipment are deteriorating and outdated. This measure will address urgent and basic repairs such as upgrading electrical wiring, gas and sewer Jines, fixing leaky roofs, repairing bathrooms, and replacing outdated plumbing and wiring to make our local college clean and safe for learning.

  • Replace outdated electrical wiring.
  • Repair deteriorating gas, electrical, water and sewer lines.
  • Improve campus safety and  security.
  • Make campus buildings more energy efficient.
  • Improve emergency communication systems.
  • Improve water conservation efforts.
  • Update campus facilities to improve handicapped accessibility.
  • Repair to the aging plumbing system to prevent flooding and water damage.
  • Remove asbestos.
  • Improve earthquake safety.
  • Repair deteriorating firewater lines and sprinkler systems.

 PROVIDING JOB TRAINING AND COLLEGE TRANSFER:

 Facility Improvements To Help Students and Veterans Transfer to Four-Year Universities or be Trained For High Demand Jobs

 Goals and Purposes: Chabot College and Las Positas College have served thousands of military veterans, many of whom have recently returned from war zones and face challenges including post-traumatic stress disorder and permanent disability. Upgraded and expanded veteran services and job training are needed so returning Service Members receive the support they need to complete their education and enter the civilian workforce.

 

Chabot College and Las Positas College provide essential job training and workforce preparation for students, veterans, and local residents.  This measure will upgrade classrooms, facilities and technology, and expand access to training programs that help students learn news skills and find better paying jobs in jobs in business, technology, nursing, early childhood education, public safety, and other high demand careers.

 

Thus the District requires funds that are locally controlled to obtain State matching funds and improve academic facilities which will allow them to continue providing access to affordable, high quality education to local students and veterans, including:

 

  • Upgrade career and vocational classrooms to better prepare students and workers for good paying jobs.
  • Upgrade classrooms and labs for science, technology, engineering, and math-related fields.
  • Provide or upgrade facilities and resources for career preparation in healthcare, nursing and early childhood education.
  • Upgrade classroom technology.
  • Provide facilities for student support services such as tutoring and career counseling.
  • Improve classrooms and resources for paramedic, firefighter and public safety programs .
  • Improve vocational classroom and labs for auto repair, agriculture and environmental science
  • Improve and expand facilities which prepare students for transfer to four-year college and universities.

* * *

FISCAL ACCOUNTABILITY

 This bond measure has strict accountability requirements including:

I. All money will benefit Chabot College and Las Positas College campuses and CAN NOT BE TAKEN BY THE STATE.

2. NO MONEY can be used for ADMINISTRATOR SALARIES or pensions.

3. Require CITIZENS' OVERSIGHT and yearly audits to ensure all funds are used locally, effectively and as promised.

4. NO ADMINISTRATOR SALARIES. Proceeds from the sale of the bonds authorized by this proposition shall be used only for the acquisition, construction, reconstruction, rehabilitation, or replacement of school facilities, including the furnishing and equipping of school facilities, and not for any other purpose, including teacher, faculty and college administrator salaries, pensions and other operating expenses.

5. FISCAL ACCOUNTABILITY. THE EXPENDITURE OF BOND MONEY ON THESE PROJECTS IS SUBJECT TO STRINGENT FINANCIAL ACCOUNTABILITY REQUIREMENTS. BY LAW, PERFORMANCE AND FINANCIAL AUDITS WILL BE PERFORMED ANNUALLY, AND ALL BOND EXPENDITURES WILL BE MONITORED BY AN INDEPENDENT CITIZENS' OVERSIGHT COMMIITEE TO ENSURE THAT FUNDS ARE SPENT AS PROMISED AND SPECIFIED. THE CITIZENS' OVERSIGHT COMMITTEE MUST INCLUDE, AMONG OTHERS, REPRESENTATION OF A  BONA  FIDE TAXPAYERS  ASSOCIATION, A BUSINESS ORGANIZATION AND A SENIOR CITIZENS ORGANIZATION. NO DISTRICT EMPLOYEES OR VENDORS ARE ALLOWED TO SERVE ON THE CITIZENS' OVERSIGHT COMMITTEE.

 * * *

 

The listed projects will be completed as needed. Each project is assumed to include its share of furniture, equipment, architectural, engineering, and similar planning costs, program/project management, staff training expenses, a customary contingency, and costs associated with the Total Cost of Ownership of facilities and equipment. In addition to the listed projects stated above, authorized projects also include the acquisition of a variety of instructional, maintenance and operational equipment, including interim funding incurred to advance fund projects from payment  of the costs of preparation of all facility planning, fiscal reporting, facility studies, assessment reviews, facility master plan preparation and updates, environmental studies (including environmental investigation, remediation and monitoring), design and construction  documentation,  and temporary housing of dislocated college activities caused by construction projects. In addition to the projects listed above, repair, renovation and construction projects may include, but not be limited to, some or all of the following: renovation of student and staff restrooms; replace aging electrical and plumbing systems; repair and replacement of heating, ventilation and air conditioning systems; acquire vehicles; upgrade of facilities for energy efficiencies, including photovoltaic/solar installations; repair and replacement of worn-out and leaky roofs, windows, walls doors and drinking fountains; replace or remove outdated buildings and classrooms and construction of new classrooms and support buildings; installation of wiring and electrical systems to safely accommodate  computers, technology and other electrical devices and needs; upgrade facilities to meet current environmental sustainability and State compliance standards; repair and replacement of fire alarms, emergency communications and security systems; upgrading, resurfacing, replacing or relocating of hard courts, fields, turf and irrigation systems; install artificial turf on athletic fields; upgrade classrooms; build or upgrade facilities for math, physical sciences, fine arts, theatre arts, and agriculture and environmental science programs; construct, expand or reconfigure facilities to create large lecture classrooms; upgrade, resurfacing and reconditioning existing parking lots; repair, upgrade and install interior and exterior lighting systems; replace water lines and valves, sewer lines and other plumbing systems; construct, upgrade, acquire or expand student dorms on campus, multi-use classrooms and Jabs, culinary and health services buildings, fine arts and visual and performing arts facilities, learning resources center, physical education/aquatic facilities, locker rooms, field lights, bleachers, press box, track replacement, administrative offices, conference center, maintenance building, student service/campus center and instructional buildings, trades and technology building, library, athletic fields, student services buildings; improve water conservation and energy efficiency; replace or upgrade outdated security and safety systems; replace existing window systems with energy­ efficient systems to reduce costs; improve insulation, weatherproofing and roofs to reduce  costs;  improve access for the disabled; install and repair fire safety equipment, including alarms, smoke detectors, sprinklers, emergency lighting, and fire safety doors; replace broken concrete walks, deteriorated asphalt; replace/upgrade existing signage, bells and clocks; demolition of unsafe facilities; install new security systems, such as security (surveillance) cameras, burglar alarms, handrails, outdoor lighting, fencing, gates  and  classroom door locks; replace sewer lines and improve drainage systems to prevent flooding; upgrade roadway and pedestrian paths for improved safety and access for emergency vehicles, site parking, utilities and grounds. The project list also includes the refinancing of outstanding lease obligations. The upgrading of technology infrastructure includes, but is not limited to, upgrading classroom technology, the funding of state-of-the-art projectors, portable interface devices, servers, switches, routers, modules, sound projection systems, information systems, printers, digital white boards, upgrade voice-over-IP, communication systems, audio/visual and telecommunications systems, call manager and network security/firewall, Internet connectivity, wireless systems, technology infrastructure, and other miscellaneous IT and instructional equipment, DATA storage, fiber/copper infrastructure; phones, identity access cards and the creation and funding of a technology endowment. At Chabot College, the Project List also includes the construction, expansion or improvement of a new student access center (student union), a biology and allied health science building, learning resources/library, seismic or other upgrades to the arcade, television, radio and performance facilities, administrative offices, workforce development labs and office, faculty offices and vehicle maintenance facility. At Las Positas College, the Project List includes the construction, expansion or improvement of a vocational education center, an integrated learning center, applied arts academic building, student dormitories, faculty housing, library materials and tech equipment.

The allocation of bond proceeds will be affected by the District's receipt of State matching funds and the final costs of each project. In the absence of State matching funds, which the District will aggressively pursue to reduce the District 's share of the costs of the projects, the District will not be able to complete some of the projects listed above. Some projects may be undertaken as joint use projects in cooperation with other local public or non-profit agencies. The budget for each project is an estimate and may be affected by factors beyond the District's control.  The final cost of each project will be determined as plans and construction documents are finalized, construction bids are received, construction contracts are awarded and projects are completed. Based on the final costs of each project, certain of the projects described above may be delayed or may not be completed. Demolition  of existing facilities and reconstruction of facilities scheduled for repair and upgrade may occur, if the Board determines that such an approach would be more cost-effective in creating more enhanced and operationally efficient campuses. Necessary site preparation/restoration may occur in connection with new construction, renovation or remodeling, or installation or removal of relocatable classrooms, including ingress and egress, removing, replacing, or installing irrigation, utility lines, trees and landscaping, relocating fire access roads, and acquiring any necessary easements, licenses, or rights of way to the property. Proceeds of the bonds may be used to pay or reimburse the District for the cost of District staff when performing work on or necessary and incidental to bond projects. Bond proceeds shall only be expended for the specific purposes identified herein. The District shall create an account into which proceeds of the bonds shall be deposited and comply with the reporting requirements of Government Code § 53410.

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